Tongue Twisters for Pronunciation

Tongue twisters are a great way to learn English

Tongue twisters are a great way to learn English by practicing and improving pronunciation and fluency.   Native English speakers use tongue twisters to practice articulating for speeches or presentations. You can find recordings of the tongue twisters below online to help you practice both your listening and pronunciation. Children learn most tongue twisters in grade school, but they’re not just for kids, but are also used by actors, politicians, and public speakers who want to sound clear when speaking.  The goal is to say them as quickly as you can as many times as you can!  Feel free to drop by guided self study to practice with a teacher during your spare time! 

  1. Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers
    A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked
    If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers
    Where’s the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?
  2. Betty Botter bought some butter
    But she said the butter’s bitter
    If I put it in my batter, it will make my batter bitter
    But a bit of better butter will make my batter better
    So ‘twas better Betty Botter bought a bit of better butter
  3. How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
    He would chuck, he would, as much as he could, and chuck as much wood
    As a woodchuck would if a woodchuck could chuck wood
  4. She sells seashells by the seashore
  5. How can a clam cram in a clean cream can?
  6. I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream
  7. I saw Susie sitting in a shoeshine shop
  8. Susie works in a shoeshine shop. Where she shines she sits, and where she sits she shines
  9. Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear. Fuzzy Wuzzy had no hair. Fuzzy Wuzzy wasn’t fuzzy, was he?
  10. Can you can a can as a canner can can a can?

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