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G.24.2 - Simple adverbs of place, manner and time

Adverbs of Time

Average: 3.5 (45 votes)

Adverbs are words that tell you more about verbs, adjectives and other adverbs.

Many adverbs end in ly. You make these adverbs by adding ly to adjectives.

Some adverbs and adverb phrases answer the question "when?" They are called adverbs of time.

For example:

"I am going to my new school tomorrow."

Adverbs of Manner

Average: 4.4 (10 votes)

Adverbs are words that tell you more about verbs, adjectives and other adverbs. Many adverbs end in ly.

You make these adverbs by adding ly to adjectives.

Some adverbs and adverb phrases describe the way people do things. They answer the question "How?"

For example:

"The traffic was moving slowly."

Adverbs of Manner

Average: 3.4 (72 votes)

Adverbs of Manner add more information to verbs to make them more specific. For example “He ran” doesn’t say much about how he ran. If you add an adverb it will solve this problem: “He ran quickly” gives us more information and sounds better.

Adverbs of Manner always come after a verb and can be used with words like very or too. Adverbs of Manner are adjectives that almost always end with –ly, though some are also irregular.

Adverbs of Manner - Elementary/Pre-Intermediate

Average: 3.5 (35 votes)

Adverbs of manner are the information providers in English. They are the words that tell us how the verb is being performed. They describe the action and are usually found after the verb. We form adverbs by using an adjective + ly

Find the adverbs of manner in the following sentences.

Quick Tip - specially vs especially

Average: 3.6 (7 votes)

Take a look at the following sentences. Which one do you think is right?

"I got home especially late yesterday."

"I got home specially late yesterday."

Quick tip - Well vs Good

Average: 3.6 (12 votes)

Well vs Good

"I speak English well."

"I speak English good."

Which of these is correct and why?

how to use adjectives and adverbs

Average: 3.4 (120 votes)

'Working hard or hardly working?'

adverbs

Adverbs are used to give us more information about a verb. They give us information on how something happens or how something is done. For example:

'She cried badly when her dog died'.

'He easily climbed the wall'.

adverbs of time

Average: 3.9 (40 votes)

 

'It's been snowing since I got here.'

We use adverbs of time to tell us when an event happened. They are also used to tell us  how long an event lasted  and how often it happens.

For Example:

I rarely see my parents.

They have already left.

I've been working here since 2005.

'There' and 'Their'

Average: 3.5 (11 votes)

 There goes your brother!

'There goes your brother.'

English learners (and native English speakers) can get confused by these two words as they have the same pronunciation, but different spellings and meanings. Here's a review and a couple of hints to help you remember:

Their is a possessive adjective like 'her', 'his', or 'our'.