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Phrasal Verb - Put One's Foot Down

Average: 3.7 (10 votes)

This month's joke is based on the double meaning of the idiom put one's foot down:

1 - To put your foot down - To act firmly / To tell someone strongly that they must do something or that they must stop doing something:
"You can't just let him do what he wants, you'll have to put your foot down."

Cartoon - Break Off

Average: 3.8 (8 votes)

This month's joke is based on the double meaning of the phrasal verb break off:

1 - Break off: To separate or become separated, as by twisting or tearing:
"Do you want some of my chocolate? I'll break off a piece for you."

Cartoon - Cut it

Average: 3 (11 votes)

Cut It - Learn English Cartoon

We use scissors to cut paper. Cut can be used as a verb. Did you know that cut is used in a common English idiom? Read on...

Cartoon - Ahead

Average: 3.2 (5 votes)

 

This month let's take a look at the word ahead. In the cartoon go on a head means put on, but this what we can mean by ahead:

Phrasal Verb - Hit On

Average: 4 (10 votes)

Let's take a look at the word hit. In the cartoon we can see two different meanings:

Hit - (verb) to strike something.

"I hit the spider with my shoe."

'Hit' as a Phrasal Verb

Hit (on) something - (phrasal verb) to realise something or to think of an idea unexpectedly.

Phrasal Verb - Make Up

Average: 3.5 (10 votes)

You've probably heard make up used as a noun for cosmetics, but did you know that it's also used as a phrasal verb?

Make up - (noun) a cosmetic worn on the face to change your appearance.

Make up - (phrasal verb) to forgive / apologise with someone and to be friends again after a fight or argument.

Phrasal Verb - Look Up

Average: 3.7 (12 votes)

 As you know, we look up at something that is above us. For example you can look up at a tall building or look up at a bird in the sky. But did you know that it can also be used in the following way:

Look Up- get better; improve.

'The weather was terrible earlier, now it's starting to look up.'

'After a terrible start, sales for the month are finally looking up.'

Phrasal Verb - Act up

Average: 3.9 (10 votes)

 

You probably know the verb to act used for actors acting in a film or in the theatre. When used as a phrasal verb with the preposition up it has a different meaning:

Act up- Misbehave; behave badly or strangely.

'My computer has been acting up recently. I need to get it repaired. It's probably got a virus.'

English Joke: Hole in One

Average: 3.3 (12 votes)

 

Today we are taking a look at an English joke. This joke is an example of a play on words - meaning that a phrase or word can can be used for more than one meaning to make a joke.

Hole in one- is used in golf when a golfer gets the ball into the hole with just one shot.

Hole in one - in this case the 'hole' means a hole in one pair of trousers.

Phrasal Verb - 'Hold Up'

Average: 3.5 (14 votes)

Here we take a look at the phrasal verb hold up. Like most phrasal verbs it has more than one meaning. Here's how we can use hold up:

to hold up- to hold something / someone up in the air.

'When we landed in the airport our driver was waiting for us; he was holding up a sign with our names on it.'

to hold up - to stop / delay someone for a moment.