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Confusing Words

Like and As

Average: 3.5 (40 votes)

When we want to talk about two things that are similar or the same we can use like and as.

To stop you getting confused when you use them remember these rules:

Like

Like is used as a preposition and should be followed by a noun:

Earth Day Reading - Upper Intermediate Level

Average: 3.7 (7 votes)

April 22, 2010 is the 40th Anniversary of Earth Day. Started in America in 1970, Earth Day is a day of celebration and activism intended to raise _A_ of environmental issues.

Words that are spelled differently but sound the same

Average: 3.2 (246 votes)

Today we have an exercise on homophones, which, as you have probably guessed from the title of the lesson, means words that are spelled differently but sound the same (They are sometimes called heterographs, but it's not important to get that technical).

For example, to, two, and too

Now choose the correct word for each sentence.

Very, Too and Enough

Average: 3.8 (54 votes)

Very

Use very before adjectives, adverbs or -ing words. Very is neutral - it is not positive or negative. It makes the word that comes after it stronger.

"Wayne is a very funny man."
"I had a very busy day at work."

-ing or -ed? Participles as Adjectives

Average: 3.9 (81 votes)

Time to brush up on (review) your understanding of participles as adjectives.

Some participles can be used as adjectives in either the present or past form.

Present Participle (-ing) is used to describe something or someone.
"I watched an interesting TV about American history last night."
"This film is boring. Let's stop watching it."

Your Questions of the Month

Average: 3 (9 votes)

These are the top questions we received from readers of our free newsletter, English in your Inbox , last month.

All questions are answered by Tim, a teacher at  EC Brighton English school.

What's the difference between disinterested and uninterested

Average: 3.4 (11 votes)

Interested is, of course, a very widely used English language word. Do know what its opposite is? Actually, there are two words which seem similar, yet have difference uses. Let's take a quick look at disinterested and uninterested.

Important Forms Practice

Average: 3 (7 votes)

A tricky exercise for you today!

Choose the correct word in each sentence.

All of these words are very common, but very easy to confuse. Let me know which questions give you problems and I will explain the reason.

Who can get 10/10?

Link: Adjective Word Order

Poor and Poverty; Wealthy and Wealth

Average: 3.9 (8 votes)

When someone does not have money we can say they are poor. It is an adjective.
"A poor man."

The noun form of poor is poverty.
"Many people in the world still live in poverty."

Reflexive Pronouns for Upper-Intermediate students

Average: 3.8 (16 votes)

When you look in a mirror you see your own reflection, i.e. you see yourself. 'Yourself' is an example of a reflexive pronoun. Just as a mirror reflects your image, so does a reflexive pronoun reflect the subject pronoun!

Reflexive pronouns are used in two different ways: