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Confusing Words

What's the difference between disinterested and uninterested

Average: 3.4 (11 votes)

Interested is, of course, a very widely used English language word. Do know what its opposite is? Actually, there are two words which seem similar, yet have difference uses. Let's take a quick look at disinterested and uninterested.

Important Forms Practice

Average: 3 (7 votes)

A tricky exercise for you today!

Choose the correct word in each sentence.

All of these words are very common, but very easy to confuse. Let me know which questions give you problems and I will explain the reason.

Who can get 10/10?

Link: Adjective Word Order

Poor and Poverty; Wealthy and Wealth

Average: 3.9 (8 votes)

When someone does not have money we can say they are poor. It is an adjective.
"A poor man."

The noun form of poor is poverty.
"Many people in the world still live in poverty."

Reflexive Pronouns for Upper-Intermediate students

Average: 3.7 (15 votes)

When you look in a mirror you see your own reflection, i.e. you see yourself. 'Yourself' is an example of a reflexive pronoun. Just as a mirror reflects your image, so does a reflexive pronoun reflect the subject pronoun!

Reflexive pronouns are used in two different ways:

Prepositions: in, on, at - Level: beginner/elementary

Average: 3.2 (13 votes)

Here's a basic look at prepositions. Sometimes even high-level English learners can forget which prepositions to use. This will be a good chance to review for some of you.

Complete these sentences using in, on, or at:

When you have finished write your own example sentences today's prepositions.

How to form Comparatives - Elementary / Pre Intermediate

Average: 3.5 (11 votes)

How to form comparatives

1 syllable adjectives. Add –er
Eg: cool = cooler

2+ syllable adjectives. Add more to the adjective
Eg: powerful = more powerful

Adjectives ending in –y. Remove –y and add –ier.
Eg: funny = funnier

Do you know these homonyms?

Average: 4 (16 votes)

A Intermediate level lesson for you today.

Spending a lot of time on English language sites is a great way to practice your English. Leaving comments (as you can on this site) is an even better way to practise.

When writing English you should be careful of tricky homonyms.  A homonym is a word that sounds the same as another word but has a different spelling and different meaning.

For example: flower and flour

Can you write a homonym for each each word below?

Your English Questions of the Month

Average: 2.3 (9 votes)

Every month we ask our newsletter readers to send in their questions to Tim, our English teacher at EC Brighton English language school, about the English language. Here are your questions:

 

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November's Star Question!

Thanks to Maria Aura for this question:

Confusing Words - Look, See, Watch and Listen & Hear

Average: 3.6 (10 votes)

Simple words are often easy to confuse.

Today I want you to explain me about the difference between look, see & watch and then listen & hear.

Use the comments section to explain what's the difference in meaning and give some example sentences. To get you thinking, I have created a ten-question quiz for you to try.

So who is going to be the first person to write a explanation?

I know you can do it!

Your Top English Questions Answered

Average: 3 (10 votes)

Every month we ask our newsletter readers to send in their questions to Tim, our teacher at EC Brighton, our English language school in Brighton, about the English language. Here are your questions:

 

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Star Question!

Thanks to Kate Kapustina for this question: