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Phrases

Vocabulary: Renting accommodation

Average: 3.9 (15 votes)

Happy Monday to you all! :)

We've prepared a list of useful and easy short questions you can ask when you're looking to rent accommodation - rooms, apartments, a flat, a house, whatever it might be!

1. I would like to rent a flat/apartment please.

2. I would like to be close to the town centre, with a view of the beach.

3. What does the flat/apartment contain?

4. Is bed linen available?

5. Are towels provided?

6. Is there a cleaning/housekeeping service?

7. Are there any sports facilities?

How to describe objects

Average: 4.3 (14 votes)

Learning English means hearing many new words you've never come across before. When you talking to someone and say a word you don't know it's important for you to find out what it is. Here's how we can ask for the meaning of a noun and how we can describe objects. This exercise will help you learn a few useful expressions as well as reviewing your vocabulary. How many of these objects do you know?

What's a pen? It's something we use to write with.

Talking about jobs

Average: 3.6 (32 votes)

'What is your job?', is grammatically correct but not usually the way we ask someone's occupation. Instead we ask, 'What do you do?' or the longer form, 'What do you do for a living?'

Some common ways to answer are:

 

How to talk about football

Average: 2.9 (16 votes)

The 2014 World Cup is well underway in Brazil. Here are some expressions that will help you talk about football in English.  

1) I missed the Brazil game. What was the score?

2) England have to win this game to go through to the next round.

3) If they don't win they will go out.

4) Who scored for Japan?

5) I can’t believe the referee didn’t give a penalty.

6) He was miles offside!

7) That was never a foul – he dived.

8) Who did you think will win? What do you think the score will be?

Idiom of the Day: From Scratch

Average: 3.7 (19 votes)

scratch idiom

This month's cartoon is based on the word scratch.

Scratch

Scratch (verb)

to rub your skin with your fingernails, often when your skin is itching. In the picture, the scientist is scratching his neck.

"She scratched her nose."

"My back is itching. Can you scratch it for me?"

'Up' Phrasal Verbs

Average: 3.9 (40 votes)

Up is a small word with a wide use in English. Today we look at phrasal verbs and collocations that feature it.

All can be an adverb, preposition, adjective noun and verb. Read through this text and choose the correct missing words.

Fall Phrasal Verbs for Business English

Average: 3.9 (22 votes)

Fall out

To argue and disagree with someone.
"She left the company after falling out with her boss."

Fall through

For a plan or agreement to fail.
"John agreed to sell his car to Tom but the deal fell through. Now John needs to find a new buyer."

Dark Idioms

Average: 3.7 (45 votes)

Dark is an adjective which is the opposite of bright. Dark things have very little light. In idioms, dark often refers to mystery.

Let's take a look at these four common dark idioms.

In the dark

When you are in the dark about a situation, you do not know anything about it. You are uninformed about it. When we keep someone in the dark about something, we do not tell them something or keep a secret from them.

How to talk about future situations

Average: 3.4 (30 votes)

Future Real Conditional

The future real conditional describes what the speaker will do in a specific situation in the future. Although we do not know what will happen in the future the future real conditional is called 'real' because it refers to a possible action that could occur.

Lesson by Tristan, teacher at EC Malta English school

Collocations - Make, Do, Have

Average: 3.7 (23 votes)

Collocations are groups of two or more words that generally go together.
In English, we say:

I'm going to make a cup of tea.
He's doing nothing at the moment.
I’m having a good day!

Make tea, do nothing and have a good day are examples of collocations.