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Grammar

Elementary Level: Adjective + Of

Average: 3.3 (30 votes)

Some adjectives are followed by a preposition. It can be confusing for English learners because there are no rules to help you remember which prepositions are used with which adjectives. The best way to learn is through practice.

The following seven adjectives are all used with the preposition of.

Example: The letter I wrote was full of mistakes.

Passive and Active Sentences for Low-Intermediate Students

Average: 3.7 (29 votes)

How much do you remember about forming active and passive sentences?

If you're unsure, have a look at this lesson before you try to answer the questions below:

Remember: Is the action being done by someone or is an action being done to something? If someone is doing the action, use the active voice and if an action is being done to something use the passive! Good luck!

Lesson by Caroline

Get / Become

Average: 3.7 (34 votes)

The word get has many different meanings in English, such as 'receive'. However, another very common meaning is also 'become'.

For example: “I’m getting cold” means the same as “I’m becoming cold”
The only real difference is that get is more informal and popular to use.

The structure is: GET + ADJECTIVE.

Past Continuous or past simple?

Average: 3.7 (24 votes)

Sometimes it can be tricky to decide which tense we need to use. Remember these rules to help you:

So and Such

Average: 3.5 (40 votes)

In English we have many different ways of emphasing a particular point. Words like 'very' and 'extremely' are the most known by students.

Others ways to do this are with 'so' and 'such'.

If you say: "it's so hot today!", it's a stronger emphasis than saying "it's very hot today."

The structure is: SO + ADJECTIVE

Another alternative is by saying "It's such a hot day!" This is also stronger than 'very'

The structure is: SUCH + ADJECTIVE + NOUN

Simple Adverbs

Average: 3.8 (30 votes)

Adverbs describe the way an action is completed and are commonly thought of as 'y' words.

For example, the adverb form of the adjective loud is loudly.

How well can you remember them? In each sentence, replace the adjective with the correct adverb (and be careful with your spelling):

Lesson by Caroline

Go/Went/Gone Elementary Level

Average: 4.1 (21 votes)

Go means to move from one place to another e. g "I go to school by bus."

When we add a preposition with go, we use "went" e.g. "John went into his room and shut the door."

Using It

Average: 3.5 (31 votes)

One of the most common mistakes I find students making, is when and where to use the word 'it'. Here are some sentences to help you remember when we need to use this little word.

Some of the sentences are correct, and some are missing 'it'.

Rewrite the sentences to make them correct.

I hope this helps!

Word Order: Adjectives

Average: 3.2 (19 votes)

Rules:

Do you know where to put the adjective in a sentence? Follow these simple rules to help you remember:

1. The adjective comes before the noun.
e.g. I live in a small house.
I have a blue umbrella.

2. The adjective comes after the verb to be.
e.g. I am very tired.
Careful, the food is hot!

Conjunction Review

Average: 4 (24 votes)

Conjunction: A word that links two words, phrases or clauses together. Here's another review lesson to help you practise some of the basics of English.

Choose the correct conjunction for each sentence. Then why don't you make some of your own sentences using the conjunctions to help you revise.

Lesson by Caroline