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Vocabulary

Beginner Comparatives and Superlatives

Average: 3.7 (10 votes)

Comparative adjectives compare two things. Superlative adjectives compare more than two things.

Forming comparatives and superlatives:

One syllable (part)

Adjectives that have only one syllable (part) or adjectives that end in 'y' use ‘er’ to form comparatives and 'est' to form superlatives. For adjectives that end in 'y' change the 'y' to 'i' before adding 'er' or 'est'.

Active and Passive

Average: 4.7 (10 votes)

Verbs are either in the active voice or in the passive voice. In the active voice the relationship between the verb and the subject is clear:
The company gave Paul a car.
This sentence is active. The company (subject) gave (verb)

In the passive the subject of the sentence is not the 'doer'; the person doing the action.
Paul was given a company car.

Verbs that show actions

Average: 3.2 (29 votes)

Verbs that show actions or 'action verbs' are the most used verbs.
Action verbs take 's' in the third person when they are singular verbs:
He lives in Athens.
She works in the city.
It rains a lot in February.

Negative sentences need 'do not', 'does not', or 'did not'.
He does not live in Athens.
She does not work in the city.
It does not rain in August.
It did not rain in June.

Elementary Adjectives

Average: 3.9 (13 votes)

Adjectives give more meaning to nouns.

Adjectives are normally placed in front of the noun.
An exciting film.
An interesting book.
Fast cars.
Red roses.

Elementary Level - Pronouns

Average: 3.6 (12 votes)

Look at this example:

Sarah is a university student. Sarah was born in London but now Sarah lives in Paris where Sarah is studying French. Sarah’s boyfriend is Louis. Louis is French and Louis met Sarah in Paris. Sarah and Louis want to get married. Sarah’s and Louis’ parents are very happy.

Now here is the same example using pronouns:

Possessive Nouns

Average: 4 (11 votes)

Possessive nouns show who owns something or who something belongs to.
Possessive nouns are formed with ('s)

Sarah's car.
Peter's lap top.
The school’s headmaster.

When the noun is plural and ends with 's', just add (')
The babies' toys.
My parents' house.

Elementary Level - Countable and Non-countable Nouns

Average: 3.1 (12 votes)

Count nouns are nouns that can have one or more than one.
A pen – three pens, a bottle – six bottles, a television – three televisions, a car – five cars.

Count nouns can be used with;
A few, few, many, some, every, each, these etc.
A few pens, many bottles, a few cars, each television etc.

Count nouns can be used with a/an or the
There is a pen on my desk.
I bought a bottle of Italian wine.
Each television in the flat was a new model.
My family has five cars.

Countable and Uncountable Nouns

Average: 4.1 (16 votes)

Being able to identify between countable and uncountable nouns is necessary to use English grammar correctly.

Countable nouns

Most nouns in English are countable:
He has two homes, one in London and one in Spain.
The beer cost six pounds.
I’ve never seen Sarah travel with less than two suitcases.

Let Make Have Get

Average: 4.2 (13 votes)

The verbs 'let', 'make, 'have' and 'get' cause a considerable amount of confusion. Here is an overview of their functions and meanings when speaking about allowing, forcing, giving responsibility and convincing people to do things.

Let

'let+person+verb'
Here 'let' is used to mean allow

My dad lets me drive his car.
Will your boss let you leave early tomorrow?
My sister doesn't let us speak about her divorce.

Who Whom Whose

Average: 3.9 (32 votes)

To understand how to use 'who', 'whom' and 'whose' you first have to understand the difference between subjects, objects and possessives.

The subject does the action:
He likes football.
She goes to university.
They enjoy travelling.