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Vocabulary

Effect and Affect

Average: 4.8 (19 votes)

There is often confusion over the words ‘effect’ and ‘affect’. In order to understand the difference it is important to remember that ‘effect’ is a noun whereas ‘affect’ is a verb.

Effect

Effect is a noun meaning outcome, consequence or appearance.
What effect did the economy have on your business?

Affect

Affect is a verb meaning 'to transform' or 'to change'.
Did the economy affect your business?

Can and May

Average: 4.7 (12 votes)

Two words which are often confused are can and may.

Can

The word can is used to denote ability:

I can swim. ( I have the ability to swim)
She can play the piano. (She has the ability to play the piano)
Can he speak Japanese? (Does he have the ability to speak Japanese)

May

The word may is used to denote permission:

Beside and Besides

Average: 4.5 (17 votes)

Sometimes beside and besides are confused especially with writing.

Beside

The word beside is a preposition. It means close to or next to.
Come and sit beside me.
He lives beside a Turkish take away.

Upper Intermediate Reading: Africa

Average: 3.8 (29 votes)

There are many wonderful places to visit in Africa, this place is definitely one I would recommend.

Read the passage below and find the definitions of the words underlined from the list below.

Lesson by Jean, teacher at EC Cape Town English school

Advice and Advise

Average: 4.8 (9 votes)

Advice and advise are normally confused. 'Advice' is a noun and it means 'a suggestion' or 'a beneficial course of action'. Advice is a non-count word so it has no plural and can't be used with the indefinite article:

Parents give good advice. NOT Parents give good advices.
He gave me a good piece of advice. NOT He gave me a good advice.

'Advise' is a verb and it means 'to give advice'

Advise (verb)

If you ask me, I'd advise you to take the job offer.
You are lucky if you have friends to advise you.

 

Accept and Except

Average: 4.4 (15 votes)

There is often confusion over the two words ‘accept’ and ‘except’. Although they sound similar the meanings are very different.

 

Accept

Accept is a verb that has quite a few meanings:
To believe something is true.
I accept your point and I have to agree with you there.
I accept that you may have been tired but it’s no excuse to fall asleep in front of our clients.

To receive something
I accept your invitation.
They do not accept dogs in that restaurant.

Linking Words

Average: 4 (23 votes)

Linking words in English are words that are used to combine or link sentences, two statements presenting contrast, comparison, condition, supposition, purpose, etc. Here are some examples of some linking words.

As long as
provided (that)
providing

You can take my car as long as/provided (that)/providing
you don't damage it.
(I will lend you my car on condition that you don't damage it.)

A lot of, Much, Many

Average: 4.4 (17 votes)

Here is an overview of the use of the quantifiers a lot of, much and many.

A lot of

A lot of’ can be used in all sentences; affirmative, negative and interrogative.

We made a lot of mistakes during our first test.
I don't have a lot of friends who live next to me.
Did you do a lot of shopping in London?

Prepositions

Average: 3.6 (31 votes)

 A preposition is a word that connects one thing with another and shows how they are related. It is usually followed by a noun or a pronoun.

Prepositions can tell us about place or position:

The book fell off the table.
My shoes are under the bed.
I jumped into the pool.
I keep my keys in my handbag.
Sarah is at school.

They can also tell us about time:

Collocations - Make, Do, Have

Average: 3.8 (19 votes)

Collocations are groups of two or more words that generally go together.
In English, we say:

I'm going to make a cup of tea.
He's doing nothing at the moment.
I’m having a good day!

Make tea, do nothing and have a good day are examples of collocations.