From the Book Nook

by Sheetal Makhan / AYC I like to support South African authors, and when I picked this book up a few weeks ago, the synopsis at the back really caught my attention. It’s the biography of Ayesha (Bibi) Dawood, a dedicated activist from the 1950’s. She was one who stood trial with others like Nelson Mandela during the Treason Trials. She endured harassment and being imprisoned – being separated by her family for months on end. During all this political turmoil, on the other side of the world, Yusuf was pining! He saw “Bibi” for the first time in India a few years back and jumped ship in Durban to travel to Worcester (just outside Cape Town) to find his lady love. Actually, I’d love to give more information about this story, but it would spoil it for you if you decided to read it! I absolutely loved this. It was a love story like none I’ve heard of before and I found myself thinking of the characters even when I wasn’t reading. I found it to be quite an easy read and I have no doubt that our students would enjoy it just as much. The English Academic Year Programme believes that Readers are Leaders!

EC Book Recommendation – learn English while reading!

by Sheetal Makhan / Academic Year Coordinator They say “You shouldn’t judge a book by its cover“, but in this case I couldn’t help it. While browsing through a local bookstore lately, my eyes fell on doe-eyed Saroo Brierley as a child – pictured on the cover of the book he authored, “A Long Way Home“. Words that jumped out for me were “India / lost / Australia / adopted / Google Earth / reunited” I was instantly hooked! The book is a very easy read and follows the footsteps of Saroo. We feel his fear as he wanders away from his home and finds himself on a moving train…which ends up in Calcutta. He’s in the midst of the city’s hustle and bustle and is feeling scared. As a little boy who is uneducated, it is clear that he is vulnerable and is at risk of being either kidnapped or left to die of hunger. Books that are based on true stories are really powerful and makes the reader feel as though they are IN the story, experiencing the pain and heartache along with the main character. Because of Saroo’s colourful and descriptive writing, one can almost hear the trains zooming past and smell the pollution which lingers in the air. I’m thoroughly enjoying this at the moment and recommend it to anyone who is looking for an adventure. I am especially looking forward to the part where Saroo reaches adulthood and with the help of Google Earth, finds his way back home. From Australia all the way back to India! Did you know? EC Cape Town’s Academic Year English Course places a lot on emphasis on reading. __________________________________ Remember to follow us on Facebook or Twitter RELATED BLOG POSTS Reading Circle Class EC Reading Award

From the Book Nook

So, what is the DOS reading? And the Mountains Echoed, by Khaled Hosseini After reading The Kite Runner and one of the most moving pieces of literature ever, A Thousand Splendid Suns, I could not resist reading Hosseini’s newest book, And the Mountains Echoed. Apart from enjoying the author’s powerful expression, I was drawn because this story is all about family and everyone from the mothers and fathers to the cousins and siblings. It explores how families care for, honour, betray and sacrifice for each other. I thoroughly believe and had had the experience to prove, that the choices we make resonate throughout our family and we are often surprised by the ramifications of those decisions. I have only just started reading this book and I have already “met” a traditional family from Kabul and I am on my way to San Francisco! Remember – Reading is Power! Happy Reading… Nicoletta Learn more about the General English courses at EC Cape Town.    

From the Book Nook

by Sheetal Makhan / AYC One of our newer additions to the Listening Centre collection has been the magnetic force causing Murat Koç to spend his afternoons reading. It really is a wonderful sight to see our students so engaged in books on a daily basis, whether it’s at 8am or 4pm. Read on to find out more about this enthralling book that Murat has been addicted to for the past few days. If you’ve read a book that you also “can’t put down”, let me know about it so we can share it with others! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~  “Solo Saxophone” by Jeremy Harmer  ‘She began to run again, away from the smoke of the explosion. Another bullet whizzed past her head. And another. Without thinking she turned down a side street, running away from the danger.’ The story is about a new war reporter’s experiences in the middle of a direful war in the early 1990’s. The book includes love, desire and hatred. Katy, the young reporter, is cheated on by her boyfriend – on her bed! Then, she makes her mind subconsciously to get to Sarajavo to report what is going on there as a war reporter. When she arrives in the city, incidents start increasing day by day. She sees the beauty of the devil during the war, mercilessly killing innocent children, women and men. Being objective in the war is getting harder for her because she gets involved. “This is not my war or your war. Don’t get involved,” a journalist says at the beginning of her work. Be warned! If you start reading this book, you will be addicted to the Listening Centre and won’t want to put it down! The story could be recommended to those who want to improve their vocabulary and listening skills. ~Murat … Read more

From the Book Nook

by Sheetal Makhan / AYC It’s lovely to see that on any given day, our Listening Centre is packed with students. One of our Advance students, Pierrick Dupuy is a regular in the Listening Centre and recently read a captivating book titled, The Enemy. This is what he had to say about it: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~  “The Enemy” – Thumbs up from Pierrick! The Enemy is a detective novel which combines genetics, spying, mathematics, and politics: it shows the skills of an ingenious author perfectly. The action takes place in England but quickly, protagonists will carry the reader to foreign countries, perfectly described by the writer’s hand. Thanks to the complex personality of the actors, suspicion is permanent: who’s who, and why are they behaving like that? The Enemy is immersed and fascinating, with a perfectly structured (but totally accessible!) plot. I strongly advise it for “High-intermediate“, “Upper-intermediate” and “Advanced” students: Nine times out of ten, readers will love it! ~Pierrick Dupuy, Advance