Idiom of the Week — “Break Out in Laughter/Tears”

  Sometimes, while walking past classrooms where a student is taking a one on one English course in Miami, the sound of laughter can suddenly be heard.  The student and teacher break out in laughter for no apparent reason.  Did someone say something funny? Perhaps someone looks strange, and that is causing them to suddenly break out in laughter.  Often at movies, the audience will break out in laughter at the same time when something funny happens on the screen.  Other times, in sad movies, people may break out in tears when something bad happens to a favorite character. Hopefully, no one breaks out in tears in our classes here! If a person breaks out in laughter (or tears), it means that they are laughing (or crying) suddenly.  Another idiom for our students to add to their growing list!

Idiom of the Week — “Rub Elbows (with)”

In Miami, March is a great time to rub elbows with people. Even our students in one to one English lessons in Miami  are able to rub elbows with many different people. Perhaps they go to the beach.  Many of our students were rubbing elbows with thousands of people at Ultra last weekend. Some of our students even rubbed elbows with teachers and staff on St. Patrick’s Day for happy hour with green beer! Of course by now you know that rubbing elbows with someone is another way of talking about social interaction with other people. It isn’t always necessary for elbows to touch when you are rubbing elbows!

Idiom of the Week — “get into the spirit”

  Here at EC Miami, we try to do many things in order for students to get into the spirit of various themes and holidays.  On Halloween, for example, students and staff got into the spirit by wearing different costumes and listening to Halloween-themed music during our party.  Before the New Year, students got into the spirit by making resolutions for the coming year.  This month, we’re asking students to get into the spirit for St. Patrick’s Day (Today!) by wearing green.  Drinking green beer is another way people here get into the spirit every March 17. Of course, you know that to get into the spirit is to become enthusiastic about something.  If you are taking classes with a group or one to one English classes in Miami, you will be able to learn this idiom and many more!

Idiom of the Week — “be a full house”

  On Mondays, we receive new students here at EC Miami.  Students looking for General English classes. Students looking for one to one English lessons in Miami. Sometimes, we have so many people coming in, that we need to do our testing in more than one room.  You could say that it’s a full house! Frequently when we have guest speakers, we have to schedule two because it is a full house! Many times, when you go to clubs or concerts, there isn’t any room to walk around — a full house! This month, on March 17 (St. Patrick’s Day), many bars will be serving green beer to full houses all across the country (if not the world!) Of course, you know that a full house is not only a hand in poker, but also when a place is so crowded that there isn’t enough space!

“What is a ‘Gloucesterman’?” — by Kristina Lazutkina

I have been co-teaching the FCE class here at EC Miami since early January.  The writing section of this test tends to give students a particularly hard time, and I have worked this class particularly hard in order to help them practice.  FCE students are also expected to read the book The Perfect Storm, as one of the questions on the writing section will ask about this book. Today, I gave the class two writing options, and 15 minutes to complete it.  The idea is to get the class to think in English, as opposed to translating from their language. Kristina, one of my Russian students in the class, wrote a great practice essay today related to the book.  She has shown great improvement in our classes and I’m sharing her essay on “What is a ‘Gloucesterman’” with her kind permssion: To be a ‘Gloucesterman’ doesnt’ mean to be born in Gloucester or live there. To be a Gloucesterman doesn’t mean to be a fisherman.  This definition doesn’t make you, you make this definition.  You can call yourself a Gloucesterman if you deserve it. The fishermen call themselves Gloucestermen not because they provide their hometown with a lot fish.  They call themselves this because they don’t know the meaning of “fear”.  They are men who never give up.  They are men who have a goal and do everything to reach it. The Gloucesterman is adventurous, brave, and warm-hearted.  The Gloucesterman always supports and protects their fellow crewmembers. The Gloucesterman doesn’t know how to lose.  Only death can destroy them.  But even that takes a lot of effort. Great job, Kristina!  You showed a lot of thought! ** Remember, in addition to small group classes, one to one English lessons in Miami are also available! **

“What is a ‘Gloucesterman’?” — by Maria Romanenko

I have been co-teaching the FCE class here at EC Miami since early January.  The writing section of this test tends to give students a particularly hard time, and I have worked this class particularly hard in order to help them practice.  FCE students are also expected to read the book The Perfect Storm, as one of the questions on the writing section will ask about this book. Today, I gave the class two writing options, and 15 minutes to complete it.  The idea is to get the class to think in English, as opposed to translating from their language. Maria, one of my Russian students in the class, wrote a great practice essay today related to the book.  She has shown great improvement in our classes and I’m sharing her essay on “What is a ‘Gloucesterman’” with her kind permssion: I have just finished watching the movie “The Perfect Storm”.  I did it for the second time already and I will do it again after a while.  Why would I do it?  Because it gives me inspiration to live, to do my best.  It motivates me to have a challenge and achieve my goals.  I want to be a Gloucesterman! To be a Gloucesterman means to have no fear, to love life, to be responsible for your family, to respect people around and to be proud for what you do.  That definition came from one very clear example when the rescue team tried to find people to save.  One of them said that most of the people were from Gloucester. That move and book had a very sad ending.  And it’s based on a true story.  For me, it’s a perfect example of strength. Great job, Maria! — Mark   ** Remember, in addition to small group classes, one to … Read more

Student Testimonial — Pablo!

Here at EC , we teach General, Intensive, Semi-Intensive, as well as One to One English lessons in Miami.  Pablo is one of our Intensive English students from Brazil: I chose Miami because I wanted to know this city. I learned many things such as grammatical rules and English speaking skills. I improved my English a lot with EC School. My favorite class was the intensive class because I can interact with other foreign students.  I especially liked the business class because I can apply that knowledge into my job. And I love my accommodation that EC allocated to me. It was very comfortable. I feel that the EC Staff cares about their students. During my stay, I met many international friends from Switzerland, South Korea, France, Italy and Russia. I will remember the good lessons that I have learned here.

Playing Word Games With Former Students

  Over the past week, I rediscovered a particular word game on my smartphone.  I thought it would be a good idea for my students to be able to practice, and mentioned it to them in class last week.   Two of my students (who are now former students) found me on there, and we’ve had a friendly competition going on for the past few days.  This particular game I was winning, but I’m currently in the middle of one where I’m losing by over 100 points.   She likes to say it’s because she was a good student —  I prefer to say it’s because I’m a good teacher.  Either way, it’s been fun to have some friendly competition and expand vocabularies at the same time.  It’s almost like giving one to one English lessons in Miami! If you have a smartphone, check your store for variations of this.  If you can find me, I’ll be happy to take you on as well! — Mark

Idiom of the Week — “Be All Smiles”

  Earlier this week, a group of our students (taking either General English or One to One English lessons in Miami) went to the Miami Heat game.  As you can see from the above photo, they were all smiles.  For some of them, they were all smiles because it was their first NBA game.  Others were all smiles because the Heat won.  But all of them were all smiles watching Lebron James’ record-setting performance that night (61 points!). Hopefully, they will also be all smiles when they finish their courses here and improve their English.  Being able to speak another language is a great reason to be all smiles! By now, you’ve figured out that when someone is all smiles, it means that they are very happy!