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vocabulary

An explanation

What does "down to earth" mean?

Thank you

Culture Lesson: East London

Average: 3.9 (12 votes)

Street sign in London's famous East End.

Whenever you hear the words 'London' and 'shopping' you probably automatically think Oxford Street, Regent Street or Covent Garden. But there is a kaleidoscope of possibilities and next time you’re in the capitol I suggest you get out of the centre and head East to get a real taste of what London has to offer.

An explanantion

Context "technical"

Reports of highlights

by EL

What is EC?

Average: 3.5 (8 votes)

Reception, EC Malta

Culture Lesson: Presidential Inauguration

Average: 3.9 (8 votes)

Obama-mania hit America as Barak Obama officially became the 44th president of the USA at his inauguration.

English Joke: Hole in One

Average: 3.2 (18 votes)

 

Today we are taking a look at an English joke. This joke is an example of a play on words - meaning that a phrase or word can can be used for more than one meaning to make a joke.

Hole in one- is used in golf when a golfer gets the ball into the hole with just one shot.

Hole in one - in this case the 'hole' means a hole in one pair of trousers.

DIFFRENCE BETWEEN "DO" AND "DOES"

Hi, AM ARCHANASHARMA.
TELL ME WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "DO" AND "DOES"
HOW CAN WE USE THIS WORDS IN SENTENCES. PLEASE TELL ME.

How are you?/How have you been?

How are you and How have you been?

Are these two identical or they should be used in different situation?

TOEFL Questions

Average: 3.9 (14 votes)

Read through the following ten sentences and choose the correct meaning for each key word:

1 - Excuse me, may I enquire what time your restaurant closes tonight?

2 - I'm happy to let you know that even though the top was loose it stayed on.

3 - They had to restrain the young boy from climbing into the washing machine. He could have been badly hurt.

German words used in English

Average: 3.9 (12 votes)

Guten tag! English and German both descended from a West Germanic language, though their relationship has been obscured by the great influence of French words to English dating from the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. In recent years, however, many English words have been borrowed directly from German. Here we take a look at some of the most common examples and what they mean: