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Confusing Words

More Confusing Words

Average: 3.3 (12 votes)

Here's a collection of 5 pairs of words that are troublesome to English learners. How well do you know your these confusing words? Choose the correct word to complete the sentence.

Sebastian E’Silva, EC Cape Town English school
 

Confusing words lessons

-ing/ed adjectives

Average: 3.3 (34 votes)

This grammar point is something that many students find confusing –
the difference between adjectives ending in –ed or –ing!

The main thing to remember is this:

adjectives with –ing are the cause of the feeling/situation and
adjectives with –ed are the feelings of the person/animal affected

Your English Questions

Average: 3.2 (13 votes)

Every month we ask our newsletter readers to send their English-language questions to EC Brighton's teacher, Tim. Here are the best questions of the month.

Sign up for our free newsletter to get your questions answered by a professional English teacher!

'Take' and 'Have' Collocations

Average: 2.7 (9 votes)

Here's some collocations with take and have.

The best way to learn collocations is through practice because there are no clear rule. The more you look at them, the more familiar they will become. We recommend writing some example sentences below.

Did anyone get 10/10? Which ones did you get wrong?

Go, Do, Play - Sports Collocations

Average: 3.9 (24 votes)

Hi everyone, here's some sports collocations for you!

Go is generally used for sports and activities ending in –ing (but not always).
"Let's go skiing this winter."

Do is generally used for individual sports and fighting sports.
"My son can do Judo."

Vocabulary - Word Forms

Average: 3.3 (17 votes)

Sometimes, it can be really difficult to remember how to use words which have similar meanings but different forms. For example:

Difficult - adjective - not easy to do. E.g. "That test was really difficult."
Difficulty - noun - the fact or condition of being difficult. E.g. "You can decide the level of difficulty when you play this game."

Personal Pronouns

Average: 3.6 (27 votes)

Personal pronouns are the words we use when it is clear who, or what, is being talked about. For example:

"Caroline is going to America tomorrow, she is so excited!"

In this case the personal pronoun is 'she' and refers to Caroline.

The personal pronouns for people are:

Business English - Confused in the workplace

Average: 3.8 (12 votes)

There are some words related to work that can be very confusing, as they sound similar but have very different meanings. For example:

Employer- the person who employs people (the boss).
Employee- the person who works for the employer.

Business English - Confused in the work place

Average: 3.6 (5 votes)

There are some words related to work that can be very confusing, as they sound similar but have very different meanings. For example:

Employer- the person who employs people (the boss).
Employee- the person who works for the employer.

Both, neither, either? Pre-Intermediate Level

Average: 3.7 (52 votes)