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Linking Words

Average: 4 (26 votes)

Linking words in English are words that are used to combine or link sentences, two statements presenting contrast, comparison, condition, supposition, purpose, etc. Here are some examples of some linking words.

As long as
provided (that)
providing

You can take my car as long as/provided (that)/providing
you don't damage it.
(I will lend you my car on condition that you don't damage it.)

A lot of, Much, Many

Average: 4.4 (18 votes)

Here is an overview of the use of the quantifiers a lot of, much and many.

A lot of

A lot of’ can be used in all sentences; affirmative, negative and interrogative.

We made a lot of mistakes during our first test.
I don't have a lot of friends who live next to me.
Did you do a lot of shopping in London?

Possessive Nouns

Average: 4.5 (15 votes)

We use possessive nouns to indicate ownership. Here are some examples:

That is Tracey's hat.
The children's toys are all over the floor.
James' brother has three motorbikes.
This is Tom and Susan's house.
Megan's brother’s car is very fast.

For singular nouns

Add an apostrophe and an safter the noun: 's
My sister's dress is purple. (The dress belongs to my sister)

Prepositions

Average: 3.7 (32 votes)

 A preposition is a word that connects one thing with another and shows how they are related. It is usually followed by a noun or a pronoun.

Prepositions can tell us about place or position:

The book fell off the table.
My shoes are under the bed.
I jumped into the pool.
I keep my keys in my handbag.
Sarah is at school.

They can also tell us about time:

Collocations - Make, Do, Have

Average: 3.7 (23 votes)

Collocations are groups of two or more words that generally go together.
In English, we say:

I'm going to make a cup of tea.
He's doing nothing at the moment.
I’m having a good day!

Make tea, do nothing and have a good day are examples of collocations.

In case and Unless

Average: 4.6 (14 votes)

In case

'In case' is used to express the possibility of something happening. It is used to express the idea of doing something to avoid a problem later on. It can also give a reason for an action.

Passed or Past

Average: 3.9 (14 votes)

There is often confusion over the words ‘passed’ and ‘past’.

Passed

The word 'passed' is the past simple of the verb pass or the past participle of the verb:

She passed the exam with distinction. Pass = to be successful in a test
The secretary passed the message to me. Pass = hand over (give)
We'd passed the shop 5 times before we saw it.  Pass = to move past

Should, Ought to, Need

Average: 3.8 (16 votes)

Should Ought to

For giving advice or expressing a conclusion 'should' and 'ought to' are interchangeable. They are used to express the same ideas.

You should/ought to stop smoking.
He has been working on the project all week. He should/ought to be ready by this evening.

Should is also used in hypothetical situations:
Should anyone call, take a message.
Call me should you need any help.

Whatever Whenever Wherever Whichever Whoever

Average: 3.9 (18 votes)

Here is a brief explanation of how 'whatever', 'whenever', 'wherever', 'whichever' and 'whoever' are used:

Whatever

Whatever = anything or everything; regardless of what, (many things can happen but):
Whatever you do, don’t forget to buy the drinks for dinner tonight.
Ignore David, whatever he says. He's just a joker.

Whenever

Whenever = every time; at any time; when is not important:
Whenever I plan a barbeque it rains.
Peter interrupts me whenever I speak.

Used to + infinitive

Average: 4.3 (15 votes)

The structure used to + infinitive is used to refer to a past routine or situation which no longer exists at the present time.

It refers to past habits and states that do not exist today; something that you did regularly in the past but you don’t do now. ‘Used to + infinitive’ can only refer to a past time.