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Advanced Word Building

Average: 3.4 (18 votes)

In English, words are formed with a stem which is then modified with a variety of prefixes and suffixes. These additions can dramatically change the meaning or grammatical usage of the word.

Here is a revision exercise to see if you can deduce which ‘version’ of the word is needed in each sentence. Let us know how you get on.

Lesson by Caroline

Music Video: Frank Sinatra - Send in the Clowns

Average: 3.5 (15 votes)

This is a very old, very famous song which has been performed by many renowned artists, including the following, Frank Sinatra! Before you listen, read through the lyrics and try to decide what the song is about. Is it happy or sad? Is it romantic? Then listen and complete the gaps with the missing words.

Lesson by Caroline Devane

Using It

Average: 3.5 (31 votes)

One of the most common mistakes I find students making, is when and where to use the word 'it'. Here are some sentences to help you remember when we need to use this little word.

Some of the sentences are correct, and some are missing 'it'.

Rewrite the sentences to make them correct.

I hope this helps!

Verbs + Prepositions (part 2)

Average: 3.7 (16 votes)

Continuing on from yesterday's lesson, let's take another look prepositions used after verbs.

Look at some more sentences that use a verb followed by a preposition. For example: talk about girls or look for a babysitter. Choose the correct options. Good luck!

Verbs + Prepositions

Average: 3.7 (14 votes)

Many students consider prepositions to be the most difficult part of the English language and it’s easy to understand why.

They are small words that are difficult to remember and can affect the meaning of a sentence enormously.

It takes memorisation and practice to use them correctly, but they are definitely not impossible to learn.

Let's look at sentences that use a verb followed by a preposition.

For example: wait for a bus not wait to a bus.

Choose the correct options. Good luck!

Wh-? Words

Average: 3.5 (18 votes)

The meaning of wh- question words:

When - time
Who - people
Why - reason
Where - place
Whose - possession
What - object/idea
Which - choice of alternatives

Make and Do Explained

Average: 2.7 (17 votes)

Make

Generally make means 'create'.

For example: make breakfast or make a speech. However, there are some exceptions.

Never say: make a party, in English we use throw a party or organise a party.

Do

Generally do is for activities.

Word Order: Adjectives

Average: 3.2 (19 votes)

Rules:

Do you know where to put the adjective in a sentence? Follow these simple rules to help you remember:

1. The adjective comes before the noun.
e.g. I live in a small house.
I have a blue umbrella.

2. The adjective comes after the verb to be.
e.g. I am very tired.
Careful, the food is hot!

Stormy Weather

Average: 3.9 (12 votes)

I've been reading in the news about the recent terrible weather that affected the UK. I hope it clears up a bit before I get home! Although, I do enjoy being inside on a stormy day with a film and a log fire... Here's an article which reports on the areas worst hit by the storms. Read through the article and then try to complete the gaps with the words listed below. I've given you the meanings of the missing words to help you out.

Good luck!

Lesson by Caroline

Conjunction Review

Average: 4 (25 votes)

Conjunction: A word that links two words, phrases or clauses together. Here's another review lesson to help you practise some of the basics of English.

Choose the correct conjunction for each sentence. Then why don't you make some of your own sentences using the conjunctions to help you revise.

Lesson by Caroline