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Vocabulary

Countable / Uncountable Nouns

Average: 4.7 (505 votes)

Countable / Uncountable nouns practice time, people. I've added some questions on plurals too, so think carefully before you answer. Today's task is good for Pre-Intermediate level English learners. This is a quick chance for you to review your knowledge of noun forms and subject/verb agreement. Who can get 10/10?

Link: Verbal Expressions - There is/are - It is

How to use Can't and Can't Have

Average: 3.4 (23 votes)

Can't

Can't is often used when we think that something is impossible at the present moment.

"Helen can't be in Spain because I saw her driving past my house this morning."

Can't have + past participle

Can't have + past participle is used when we are sure that something did not happen in the past.

A, An and The

Average: 3.1 (24 votes)

Read through the following sentences and decide if they need a, an, the or no word. I must be in a good mood today because I've decided to be generous; you can use these points to help you choose the right answers!

In the News: Iceland volcano closes airports

Average: 3.9 (14 votes)

Here's a reading and vocabulary exercise on a story you may be following on the news.

Flights across much of Europe are being cancelled on a second day of _A_ disruption caused by_B_thrown up from a_C_in Iceland.

Words that are spelled differently but sound the same

Average: 3.2 (286 votes)

Today we have an exercise on homophones, which, as you have probably guessed from the title of the lesson, means words that are spelled differently but sound the same (They are sometimes called heterographs, but it's not important to get that technical).

For example, to, two, and too

Now choose the correct word for each sentence.

Very, Too and Enough

Average: 3.8 (54 votes)

Very

Use very before adjectives, adverbs or -ing words. Very is neutral - it is not positive or negative. It makes the word that comes after it stronger.

"Wayne is a very funny man."
"I had a very busy day at work."

5 common phrasal verbs you should know

Average: 3.3 (54 votes)

Phrasal verbs are used a lot when we speak. They are used instead of more formal English words which have the same meaning. It is ok to use them when writing to friends; however, avoid using them in formal speaking or writing situations.

Let's take a look at 5 examples and their meanings.

Connectives - How to make longer sentences

Average: 3.3 (61 votes)

English learners often write using short sentences and have a making longer sentences.

Today we take a look at some basic words that you can use to link connect short sentences together.

Here's an example,

"We are early. There was no traffic."

"We are early because there was no traffic."

As you can see because is used to link the two pieces of information into one simple sentence.

'Alien' April Fools' story angers Jordan mayor

Average: 3.5 (12 votes)

Read this recent news story and place the words into the correct places:

A Jordanian mayor is considering _A_ a newspaper over an April Fools' Day report saying aliens had landed nearby.

Al-Ghad's front-page story on 1 April said flying saucers _B_ by 3m (10ft) creatures had landed in the desert town of Jafr, in eastern Jordan.

It said communication networks went down and frightened townspeople _C_ into the streets.

Review Past Simple Tense

Average: 3.6 (11 votes)

Today we review the past simple tense. Change these ten verbs into the past simple tense and add them to the correct sentences.

catch cost hide sleep grow smell teach blow draw forgive

Think carefully about the tense and spelling!

Link: Verb Tense Review