Learn English | A new lesson every week
Book your course now

Vocabulary

Relative Clauses - who, whose, where, which

Average: 3.6 (58 votes)

Let's take an intermediate level look at relative clauses.

A relative clause tells us which thing or person the speaker means.

"The man who works in the bank is my brother" - 'who works in the bank' tells us which man.

Noun or Adjective Quiz

Average: 3 (25 votes)

Using an adjective in a sentence when you should use a noun will make your English sound strange. Let's try cuting down on your errors by taking this short quiz. For each question you have two options. Choose either the adjective or noun form. 

Adjectives plus prepositions

Average: 2.7 (12 votes)

Test you knowledge of adjectives followed by the prepositions. Complete the sentences with the correct missing preposition.

Link: Prepositions Questions

Choose the right verb

Average: 3.5 (8 votes)

Take a look at the following ten sentences and choose the correct missing verb. This exercise is good for High Intermediate English students.

Link: Which question is best?

Three-part phrasal verbs

Average: 3.4 (27 votes)

Face Idioms

Average: 4.1 (24 votes)

Time to face up (to bravely confront something) and take on these idioms face to face (together in the same place). Do it now so that you don't lose face (to do something which makes other people stop respecting you).

slap in the face

Something that you find insulting or that disappoints you is a slap in the face:

So and Neither

Average: 3.8 (80 votes)

Comparatives

Average: 3.6 (13 votes)

Now it's time to practice comparatives!
 
These statements are all about celebrities and famous people. Do you think the statements are true or false? Leave us a comment and tell us what you think.
 
If you're not sure who some of the celebrities are, why don't you read about them online!

Lesson by Caroline Devan, a teacher at EC Cape Town English language school

uncountable and countable nouns

Average: 3.2 (25 votes)

So what's the difference between countable and uncountable nouns?

Let's take a look at two nouns: cars and water. If you stand outside you will proabably see cars passing. You can count these cars 1 car, 2 cars, 3 cars and so on.

Water, however, can not be seperated and counted. We do not say 1 water, 2 waters.

So now we know that cars are countable and water is uncountable.

Phrasal Verb - Pick Up

Average: 3.2 (5 votes)