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Vocabulary

Learning English in London

Average: 3.2 (16 votes)

Have you ever been to London? Would you like to? Read through this text and guess what you think the missing words are.

Learn English in London

Learning English in London is popular with students who come because they know they will have an _1_ experience.

In The News: The Grammy Music Awards

Average: 3.2 (15 votes)

French dance duo Daft Punk have _1_ top honours at the Grammy Awards, winning five prizes including album and record of the year. A Grammy Award (or Grammy) is an accolade by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to recognise outstanding _2_ in the music industry.

Dark Idioms

Average: 3.8 (37 votes)

Dark is an adjective which is the opposite of bright. Dark things have very little light. In idioms, dark often refers to mystery.

Let's take a look at these four common dark idioms.

In the dark

When you are in the dark about a situation, you do not know anything about it. You are uninformed about it. When we keep someone in the dark about something, we do not tell them something or keep a secret from them.

Adjectives Quiz

Average: 3.9 (24 votes)

Adjectives are used to describe things, usually used to modify nouns and pronouns. Adjectives describe how something looks, acts, feels, tastes and sounds.

Adjectives come before nouns and we can use more than one:
A beautiful, big painting.

They can also come after the verb be.
Sara is tall.

Review how much know about adjectives, take this quick quiz. How many can you get right?

Reading and Vocab Lesson: HUGE blue diamond found in South Africa

Average: 3.8 (14 votes)

Read this article about a recent discovery in South Africa. Do you know the meaning of the orange words? When you have finished reading, match the words to their meanings.

A rare blue diamond has been found at a South African mine famous for being the location of some of the most valuable gems ever unearthed.

Subordinating Conjunctions

Average: 4 (37 votes)

Subordinating conjunctions are conjunctions that are used at the beginning of subordinate clauses.
Some examples of these conjunctions are; although, after, before, because, how, if, once, since, so that, until, unless, when etc.

Here are examples of their use;

Conjunctions

Average: 3.9 (29 votes)

A conjunction joins words or groups of words in a sentence.

There are three types of conjunctions, today we look at two, coordinating and correlative.

1 Coordinating conjunctions – these connect words, phrases or clauses that are independent or equal; and, but, so, for, yet, not.

2 Correlative conjunctions – these are always used in pairs; both/and, either/or, neither/nor, not only/but also

With, Over, By

Average: 3.9 (31 votes)

With
'With' is used to mean 'together' or to show involvement
I was with a friend when I met Sandy.
He worked with his brother in their restaurant.
He ordered champagne with his meal.
Why don't you come shopping with me?

Capital letters

Average: 3.8 (13 votes)

The use of Capital letters helps readers read a text without confusion.

Here are the rules for capital letters. Use a capital letter in the following:

The first word in a sentence:
My sister lives in England.

The pronoun 'I':
Summer is the season I like best.

The, a/an

Average: 4 (29 votes)

The words a, an and the are types of adjectives called articles.

A and an are called indefinite articles.
A is used before singular count nouns.
A car, a book, a child, a holiday

An is used with count nouns beginning with a vowel sound.
An apple, an elephant and notice; an hour but a European. ( the 'h' in hour is silent. The 'e' in European is not a vowel sound)