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Grammar

10 sentences, 10 mistakes! But can you find them all?

Average: 3.4 (32 votes)

Below are ten sentences. Each sentence has one mistake. Only choose one option per sentence.

Use the comments area to explain what the mistakes are, why they are mistakes and what the correct sentence should be!

Which question is the most difficult? We think number nine!

Am, Are and Is

Average: 3.5 (58 votes)

English verbs have different forms in the simple present tense depending on the number and person of the subject. It is important that the verb and the subject agree. For the verb be these are:

Singular Present

I am 1st person

You are 2nd person

He is / she is / it is 3rd person

Singular Past

I was 1st person

You were 2nd person

20 Mixed Preposition Questions

Average: 3.5 (52 votes)

Prepositions are the words found before nouns, pronouns, or other substantives to form phrases functioning as modifiers of verbs, nouns, or adjectives.

They give us more information on where, when and why things happen.

Using the wrong preposition is a common mistake made by English learners.

Choose the best preposition in each sentence:

Using the Past Perfect Tense

Average: 4 (74 votes)

The past perfect tense is used to express action completed in the past:

"She had eaten is an example of the tense."

The past perfect tense represents action that occurs BEFORE another past action:

"My boss had gone before I had the chance to see him."

How to Form the Past Perfect Tense

The past perfect tense uses had + the past participle of the main verb

"She had never tried surfing before she visited Australia."

Simple Past Tense Exercise

Average: 3.3 (43 votes)

Use the simple past tense to talk about actions that have already finished. It doesn't matter when in the past they happened or how long they happened for.

Take a look and compare the present tense verbs with simple past tense verbs in these two sentences.

Present:
I take my young brother to the park and buy him an ice-cream. We kick around a football, laugh and talk for hours.

Too & Not Enough

Average: 3.7 (56 votes)

Use not enough and too when something is inadequate.

Too + Adjective

When the amount of something is more than needed/wanted we can use too + adjective. It is only used in negative situations.

It's too cold in this room, close the door.

I'm too tired to play football tonight.

She said she was too old to go to nightclubs.

Find the 10 common mistakes

Average: 3.8 (50 votes)

Take a look at these ten sentences, there is one mistake in each one. Can you find all of them? Write your correct sentences in the comments area.

All about Adverbs

Average: 3.5 (67 votes)

Adverbs modify other words apart from nouns and pronouns. For example:

He was driving.

He was driving dangerously. - here the adverb modifies driving and gives us more information about the action.

5 Types of Adverbs

These are the five types of adverbs:

Adverbs of Manner:
She sings beautifully.
We ran quickly.

Verb Conjugation

Average: 3.7 (32 votes)

In English, the verb we use in a sentence depends on its subject. How the verb changes is called a conjugation.

There are six object 'persons'.

First person singular

I am British.

I speak English.

Second person singular

You are British.

You speak English.

Third person singular

He is British.

He speaks English.

How to form plural nouns

Average: 3.7 (41 votes)

The following sentence contains a singular noun.

They keep their car in the garage.

The following sentence contains a plural noun.

They keep their cars in the garage.

Plural nouns indicate there is more than one of something.

Making plural nouns

When a noun the ends in s, x, ch, or sh, add es to the end:

There is a an old church in the village.
There are two old churches in villages.