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How would you reply to these questions?

Average: 3.8 (4 votes)

What do you think is the best response to each question?

1) What did John say?

a) He said he would call you tonight.
b) He saying he would call you tonight.
c) He calling you tonight he said.

The correct answer is a) 'He said he would call you tonight' because it is the correct use of reported speech.

2) Have you seen Belinda?

a) I haven't seen her since 3 days.
b) I haven't seen her for 3 days.
c) I seen her 3 days ago.

What's the difference between amount and number?

Average: 3.4 (7 votes)

The confusion between amount and number is common but can be easily overcome. They are not interchangable - their use relates to countable and uncountable nouns.

Amount

Use amount is with uncountable nouns and abstract nouns:

amount of time

amount of snow

amount of noise

amount of love (abstract noun)

amount of pride (abstract noun)

Number

Bedroom Vocabulary

Average: 5 (6 votes)

Can you raed tihs sntecene?

Can you read this sentence?

Smoe of the lteters hvae been mxeid up.

Some of the letters have been mixed up.

Raed touhrgh the flolnowig sncteeens and ulcrmnabse the key wdros.

Read through the following sentences and unscramble the key words.

Tpye the crcroet seilpnlg in the bexos.

Type the correct spelling in the boxes.

All the wodrs are rteaeld to bdeomros.

In the news: Smoking

Average: 4.2 (6 votes)

Do you smoke?

Did you know the UK government are trying to pass a law banning branding on packs of cigarettes.

If they are successful tobacco manufactuers will be forced to sell their cigarettes in plain packets.

The motivation behind this decision is to make smoking less appealing to people, especially children.

A similar law was passed in Australia in 2012 that has resulted in a fall in smoking rates from 15.1% to 12.8% for people aged 14.

Find the 10 mistakes

Average: 4.2 (11 votes)

We've had a lot of requests for another find the mistakes quiz. Like last month's lesson, all you have to do find the one mistake in each sentence. Rewrite the correct sentences in the comments area.

Click 'Show Answers' to see the correct sentences.

Ten sentences, ten mistakes

1) I'll be with you in a moment, please being patient.

2) She do judo in her spare time.

Be Verbs

Average: 4.5 (13 votes)

To be is one of the most common and confusing English verbs. It tells us what something is, who they are and what I am.

I go home. Home is my place to rest. I like the smell of my house. I feel totally relaxed. Home refreshes me. At home, I get ready for a new day.

"Be" verbs indicate a state of being.

Subject verb agreement is very important:

I am English.
He is funny.
We are late.

Negatives:

verb + not = negative sentence

Vocabulary Lesson: Drink More Water!

Average: 3.9 (14 votes)

Roughly 60 percent of the body is made of water, but how _1_ of it do you drink in a day? Although it's the best thing we can put in our body most of us are not drinking _2_.

Drinking water in either plain or in the form of other fluids or foods is _3_ to your health. Experts recommend adults drink between 8 and 10 glasses a day. Drinking coffee or soda are not included because they can dehydrate you.

So why should we drink water?

Sickness Vocabulary

Average: 4.2 (11 votes)

You are more likely to get sick during winter, so here are some expressions that, unfortunately, you might find useful at this time of year:

Catch a cold / Pick up a cold

Catch means get, so catch a cold means get a cold. We can also say pick up a cold.

I caught a cold from my brother. I hope I don't give it to anyone.

I don't feel very well today, I think I have picked up a cold.

Come down with a cold

When we become sick we say have come down with a cold.

All and Whole

Average: 4.3 (16 votes)

All and whole are determiners.

All the school took part in the festival. all + noun

The whole school took part in the festival. whole + noun

The with all and whole

The can be used with all and whole:

He's busy all the time. - use the after all.

Grammar - to have to do something

Average: 3.7 (13 votes)

Use have to do something to talk about your responsibilities and necessities.

I have to wear a suit to work.

Do we have to give our teacher our homework now?

They're had to rewrite the report.

Although must has the same meaning, it is used when the action is not a rule or law.