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All about Adjectives

Average: 5 (1 vote)

Adjectives are used to give us more information about nouns.

Blue cars
Young children
Difficult questions

Adjective Order

When using more than one adjective, you should use this order: size/shape + age + color + origin + material.

A small wooden box
An old Russian painting

Prefixes

To make many opposite adjectives we use the prefixes un, in, or dis at the start of the word.

Reading the world

Average: 3 (2 votes)

What are the six missing words in this text?

_1_ English journalist Ann Morgan realised that most of the books she read were by British and American authors, she decided to set herself a challenge: she would _2_ to read a book from every country in the world in English.

After creating a blog and promoting her mission on social media, she asked _3_ from around the world to recommend the books she should read.

Elgin Marbles: True or False Exercise

Average: 3.4 (11 votes)

Today's article is based on a topical issue in the news.

Hollywood actor George Clooney's new wife, lawyer Amal Alamuddin Clooney, has made a plea for the return of the Parthenon Marbles to Athens, in what Greeks hope may inject new energy into their national campaign.

The Parthenon Marbles, also known as the Elgin Marbles are a collection of classical Greek marble sculptures that originally were part of the Parthenon and other buildings on the Acropolis of Athens.

10 'All' Idioms

Average: 3.8 (8 votes)

All in your head

When you imagine something that is not real, it is all in your head.

They were not gossiping about you, it’s all in your head.

All ears

When you are ready and eager to listen, you are all ears.

Tell me what she said, I’m all ears.

All in a day’s work

When something is unusual for other people but not unusual for you, it’s all in a day’s work.

Choose the missing words

Average: 3.8 (15 votes)

Read through this short text and guess what the missing words are:

Tim and Sara were brother and sister. They lived with their parents on a farm deep in the countryside.

As children they were never bored because there was always something to _1_ on the farm. Every day they would _2_ up early and help their parents feed the cows _3_ school.

4 'Letter' Idioms

Average: 3.8 (11 votes)

To the letter

If you do exactly what you are told to do, you follow instructions to the letter.

I don't know how it went wrong, I followed the instructions to the letter.

a Dear John letter

A letter a woman send to her boyfriend when she wants to end their relationship.

He's upset because he just got a Dear John letter from his girlfriend.

High School Subjects

Average: 4 (11 votes)

The core school subjects are English, Maths and Science. There are many subjects we learn in Bristish high schools. Here are some of the ones we remember from our school days.

Maths / Mathematics

The study of numbers and shapes.

As part of maths you learn amongst other things algebra and geometry.

Algebra

A type of mathematics in which letters and symbols are used to represent quantities.

Differences between British and American English

Average: 4.2 (12 votes)

-re / er

Words that end in -re in British English usually end -er in American English:

British: centre
American: center

-our / -or

Words that end in -our in British English often end in -or in American English:

British: colour
American: color

-ise / -ize

-ise verbs are always spelled with -ize in American English:

In the news: Nobel Prize

Average: 4 (7 votes)

Three physicists have been awarded the Nobel Prize for changing the way the world is lit _1_.

Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano of Japan and U.S. scientist Shuji Nakamura were _2_ by the committee of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences to share the $1.1 million prize.

Using 'Wish'

Average: 4 (5 votes)

The main use of 'wish' is to say that we would like things to be different from what they are, that we have regrets about the present situation; we want something to happen or to be true even though it is unlikely or impossible.

I wish I was thin. (I am not thin.)
In formal English, use the subjunctive form 'were' and not 'was' after 'wish'.
I wish I were thin.