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The History of Halloween!

Average: 5 (1 vote)

October is a month loved by many - mostly because of Halloween! Fill in the blanks with the past tense of the verbs in parentheses using the possible answers below.

Ordinal vs Cardinal Numbers

Average: 4.8 (4 votes)

You may have heard your English teachers refer to two different kinds of numbers: cardinal numbers and ordinal numbers. If the difference is confusing for you, don’t worry! Continue reading below to learn when and how to use both types of numbers.

Cardinal Numbers
Cardinal numbers are primary numbers – that means that they show how many of something there are. These cannot be fractions or decimals, but have to be whole, counting numbers. These include one, two, three, four, five, six, etc.

Ex. Charlie has two (2) cats.

Parts of Speech

Average: 3.7 (23 votes)

When your teacher talks about ‘parts of speech’, they’re talking about the building blocks of the language. It’s important to know the different ‘types’ of words as soon as possible, because these basics will make it easier to learn more complex pieces of language, and follow more advanced lessons when you’re getting ready to study English abroad!


What is a gerund and how do you use it?

Average: 3.5 (10 votes)

A gerund is type of noun that is created by adding ‘-ing’ to a verb, for example:

Verb: Eat
Gerund (Noun): Eating

In some cases, we need to add an extra consonant before the -ing. This typically happens when the last consonant in the verb follows a single, short vowel:

Verb: Swim
Gerund (Noun): Swimming (Swim + m + ing)

Verb: Run
Gerund (Noun): Running (Run + n + ing)

Phrasal Verb: Fall apart/down/out

Average: 4.6 (10 votes)

This week’s lesson is about common phrasal verbs involving “to fall”. The past tense of this verb is fell.

Fall apart
Break into pieces
“My new t-shirt is falling apart!”

Fall down
Fall to the ground
“Josh fell down during the basketball game last night.”

Fall out
Become detached and drop out
“All children’s teeth fall out before they get new ones." 

Listening: Yesterday by the Beatles

Average: 3.9 (16 votes)

What better way to practice understanding spoken English than by listening to some classic music? Enjoy the song Yesterday by the Beatles, and then choose the correct word for each blank space in our quiz below!

Yesterday, all my __1__ seemed so far away

Now it looks as though they're here to stay

Oh, I ___2___

In yesterday



I'm not half the man I used to be  

English Tongue Twisters

Average: 3.6 (16 votes)

Use tongue twisters to practice making different sounds. Don’t worry if you have trouble saying these sentences out loud, as they are difficult even for native speakers to say quickly. If you want a challenge, try repeating the tongue twister multiple times going as quickly as you can!


We all scream

Phrases for Job Interviews

Average: 3.8 (31 votes)

Job interviews can make even the most confident English speaker feel nervous! To help you get ready for your next interview, we’ve prepared a list of useful words and phrases to help you describe yourself, your experience, and what you can do for the company. If you want more tips for how to have a successful job interview, check out our blog post!

To describe yourself:

In the news: Rio Olympics 2016

Average: 3.8 (19 votes)

Michael Phelps has __1__ the most medals in the Olympics than anyone else in history, with a total of 28 medals, 23 of which are gold. He is planning to retire after Rio 2016, where he was beaten by Joseph Schooling from Singapore, who used to idolise Phelps as a child.

American swimmer Katie Ledecky set two new __2__ records during the games and won four gold medals overall.

How to Write a Formal Letter

Average: 4.8 (5 votes)

With the invention of email, letter writing is becoming less popular, but despite this it is an important skill. If you'd like to learn about email writing, check out our lesson about how to write a formal email. This guide is for a typed, formal letter, that you could send to a company about a job, or to your bank about your finances.

Begin your letter