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Confusing Words

What are minimal pairs?

Average: 4.5 (6 votes)

A minimal pair or close pair consists of two words with sounds that are very similar but have different meanings.

For example, rot and lot may sound similar, especially to some non-native English speakers.

Below are ten other examples of minimal pairs, in the each sentence choose the correct word. Try saying the words out aloud, do you notice how similar they sound?

Find the 10 common mistakes

Average: 3.9 (58 votes)

Take a look at these ten sentences, there is one mistake in each one. Can you find all of them? Write your correct sentences in the comments area.

Silent Letters in English

Average: 3.8 (17 votes)

In English some words have silent letters. This means that how a word is pronounced and how it is spelt is different. We write the silent letter when we spell the word, but it is not heard when we speak.

Here are some examples. The orange letter in each word is silent.

Silent B

The lift is broken, we'll have to climb the stairs.

A baby sheep is called a lamb.

Silent C

Nouns and their verb forms

Average: 3.8 (44 votes)

Today we look at some nouns, how they change into verbs and examples of use. English learners often confuse the noun form for the verb form when speaking, let's see if we can fix that problem for these words!

advice and advise

Advice (noun): My grandmother gave me some good advice.
Advise (verb): I advise you to travel abroad while you can.

What's the difference between amount and number?

Average: 3.8 (17 votes)

The confusion between amount and number is common but can be easily overcome. They are not interchangable - their use relates to countable and uncountable nouns.


Use amount is with uncountable nouns and abstract nouns:

amount of time

amount of snow

amount of noise

amount of love (abstract noun)

amount of pride (abstract noun)


Find the 10 mistakes

Average: 3.7 (27 votes)

We've had a lot of requests for another find the mistakes quiz. Like last month's lesson, all you have to do find the one mistake in each sentence. Rewrite the correct sentences in the comments area.

Click 'Show Answers' to see the correct sentences.

Ten sentences, ten mistakes

1) I'll be with you in a moment, please being patient.

2) She do judo in her spare time.

All and Whole

Average: 4.3 (28 votes)

All and whole are determiners.

All the school took part in the festival. all + noun

The whole school took part in the festival. whole + noun

The with all and whole

The can be used with all and whole:

He's busy all the time. - use the after all.

If I was or If I were

Average: 4 (38 votes)

Why is was used in the first sentence and were in the second?

If I were a millionaire, I would buy a yacht.
If I was late, it was because I got stuck in traffic.

Were for unreal situations

Use were when talking about imagined, hypothetical situations.

If I were you, I would book a flight now.
If you were an animal, you would be a cat!
I would ask her out on a date if I were ten years younger!

Can you find these ten mistakes?

Average: 3.5 (37 votes)

Here are ten sentences. Each one has a mistake. What are the ten mistakes? As you read the sentences, think about grammar, spelling, parts of speech and word forms.

Write your answers in the comments area below.

1 - This trousers are too tight for me.

2 - Have you ever seeing a monkey in the wild?

3 - She's been living in London since six months.

4 - Its much colder today than yesterday.

5 - Driving in bad weather can be danger.

6 - We are begining to see more and more birds in our garden.

7 - Are their more of those biscuits?

Your and You're

Average: 4.2 (33 votes)

Your and you're sound similar and are sometimes confused even by native speakers.


Your is the possessive form of you. It shows ownership or relationship to the person you are talking to.


Can I borrow your bike?

Your daughter is in the garden.


You're is the contraction of you are.


You're cheerful.