Book your course now

Non-count and count quantifiers

Average: 3.6 (29 votes)

Quantifiers are words that come before nouns in order to indicate the amount or how much of a non-count noun is being stated, or the number or how many of a count noun is being stated. Remember that amount and how much refer to non-count nouns while number and how many refer to count nouns. Let's look at a few examples.

Non-count nouns

"The students have a tremendous amount of work to complete before the end of the year."
"His fuel gauge was not working, so he didn't know how much gas was left."

Count nouns

"The number of people in the club exceeded the maximum occupancy."
"I don't remember how many times I have been to New York."

There are some quantifiers which are used only with non-count nouns. Here are a few examples: a little, not much, little, or too much.

There are some quantifiers which are used only with count nouns. Here are a few examples: few, many, several, or a couple of.

There are some quantifiers which are used with both non-count and count nouns. Here are a few examples: some, a lot of, plenty of, or enough.

Give these exercises a try.

By Thomas Williams
Teacher at EC San Diego English School

'Get' idioms

  • 1. There wasn't ___ traffic this morning.




  • 2. There was ___ information given during the class.




  • 3. The ___ of advice he received was well worth the cost.




  • 4. How ___ people will be coming to the party tonight?




  • 5. Unfortunately, she doesn't have very ___ friends




  • 6. I bought some milk, some apples, and a ___ bananas.




  • 7. There are a lot of movies I like, but ___ that I would see twice.




  • 8. We just bought a new house with ___ furniture included.




  • 9. The ___ of students at the school has increased.




  • 10. There is ___ water on the floor because of the storm last night








Comments

It was very instructive

It was very instructive lesson, sometimes the right answer was unobvious, I got many mistakes and learnt by them. Thank you.

query

what is the question
it was very instructive.
it was very instructive lesson the right answer,is what pls how can i understand this

Thanks, it was a nice lesson

9/10 - I could not do it without mistakes.
Hopefully, I will be able to do it the next time!

Got 9/10. One mistake in

Got 9/10. One mistake in plenty of furniture.
Many thanks for this lesson.

Nataly I didn't make any

Nataly

I didn't make any mistakes, thank you for the explanation, I found about number and amount at the first time

I did 10 of 10, yet I've got

Hi!

I did 10 of 10, yet I've got a couple of questions regarding this test:

1. The was much information given during the class.

The = there??

2. I bought some milk, some apples, and _a_ few bananas.

Is the indefinite article "a" really needed here?

This message was created using 100% recycled bits.

Answer, please.

I have the same questions, as RussianBear. Answer, please.
I made two mistakes - bananas and advice. Worried
Thank you for the Lesson - very useful. Smile

RE: Answer

OK. So you are right, 'the' should be 'there' (it has now been fixed).
'A few' refers to an amount in a positive way.
'Few' refers to an amount in a negative way.

Thanks. Am I right?

Thank you for answer. Smile
I have a few bananas(it's enough for cake)
I have few bananas(It's not enough)
Am I right? Worried

I wouldn't say that. A few-

I wouldn't say that.
A few- meaning several, some. And few - small amount, minority. I'm not sure how it is collocate with positive and negative.
Break a leg (a new idiom!) for all of as.

(No subject)

Thak you

This exercises are very important for improve my english grammar, thank you for that.

7/10

this is my result.i think it is a success for me.
thank you very much

Thanks for ur lesson, very

Thanks for ur lesson, very useful.