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Either or / Neither nor

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Either …or

We can use either...or to emphasise a choice. (Either…or is used to refer to two things or people.) In most cases 'either' can be omitted.

Here are some examples:
You can either stay here or come with us.
You can stay here or come with us.

It was either John or Peter who received your message.
Either John or Peter received your message.
John or Peter received your message.

Neither …nor

neither…nor gives a negative meaning to verbs. (neither …nor is also used to refer to two things or people)

Here are some examples:
Neither Sarah nor Peter was to blame for the mistake.
Sarah liked neither Rome nor Paris. She prefers the countryside.

If a verb is already in the negative then either …or is used and not neither …nor.
Sarah didn't like either Rome or Paris.
Sarah didn't like Rome or Paris.

I don't like coffee or tea.
The restaurant doesn't have fish or vegetarian meals on its menu.

Lesson by Tristan, English teacher at EC Malta English school

Choose the correct version of the following:

  • 1) Which is correct?



  • 2) Which is correct?



  • 3) Which is correct?



  • 4) Which is correct?



  • 5) Which is correct?



  • 6) Which is correct?