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V.7.2 - Idiomatic Language

Summer - 'sun', 'shine' and 'summer' idioms

Average: 3.6 (10 votes)

 Stonehenge at sunrise

Stonehenge at sunrise.

The summer solstice, also known as ‘the longest day’, is celebrated this year on June 20, 2008. This day of the year  has the most hours of daylight and shortest night. In the Northern Hemisphere it always occurs in mid-June, while in the Southern Hemisphere it occurs in December.

Why do we say 'Jump on the Bandwagon'?

Average: 3.1 (11 votes)

Meaning: to support a cause only because it is popular to do so.

If you ‘jump on the bandwagon’, you join a growing movement in support of someone or something when that movement is seen to be about to become successful.

Why do we say 'Cut to the chase'?

Average: 4.4 (85 votes)

 

Show Girl in Hollywood Poster (1930)

Meaning:  ‘get to the point’.

Why do we say 'Pleased as Punch'?

Average: 3.8 (9 votes)

 

Meaning: ‘very pleased’

This expression refers to the Punch and Judy puppet character. Punch’s name comes from Polchinello (sometimes spelled Punchinello), an Italian puppet with similar characteristics. In Punch and Judy shows, the grotesque Punch is portrayed as self-satisfied and pleased with his evil actions.

 

Why do we say 'Over the Moon'?

Average: 3.4 (7 votes)

Meaning: very happy or delighted.

Why do we say 'Catch 22'?

Average: 3.3 (10 votes)

Meaning: an impossible 'no-win' situation

Originally exclusive to bureaucracy, and used to describe a regulation which depended on another, which in turn depended on the first, this idiom today is used to describe any no-win situation, or a situation which seems impossible or difficult because it contains two opposite facts. It originated from Joseph Heller’s famous 1961 novel of the same name.

Why do we say 'Bad Hair Day'?

Average: 3.3 (10 votes)

While a vast number of idioms originate from historical periods, this is not true of all of them, and ‘having a bad hair day’ is one of these exceptions.

Originally meaning ‘a day when your hair seems unmanageable', the use of this expression has now extended to describe a day when everything seems to go wrong.

Why do we say 'Willy - Nilly'?

Average: 3.9 (15 votes)

'She threw the money willy - nilly on the table'.

This expression has two slightly differing yet related meanings – it can mean ‘in a disorganised way’ or ‘whether with or against your will’.

Why do we say 'Mumbo Jumbo'?

Average: 3.5 (14 votes)

'She couldn't understand the text, it sounded like mumbo - jumbo.'

Why do we say 'Rack your Brains'?

Average: 3.9 (13 votes)

Meaning: To think very hard to find an answer.