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V.7.2 - Idiomatic Language

Look idioms part 2

Average: 3.1 (15 votes)

Yesterday we had a quiz on Look Phrasal Verbs. Today we continue with look idioms. Read the 7 statements and decide which responses match them.

The correct answers are given below.

Education Idioms

Average: 3.4 (34 votes)

Here are some commonly used idioms about education and learning. Have you heard any of them in class before? I've put the meanings of the idioms to help you to decide which idiom fits in each sentence. Can you think of any more education idioms? Have you ever pulled an all-nighter? Let us know!

Pre-intermediate: Idioms that relate to weather

Average: 3.8 (18 votes)

Read the following conversation and pay attention to the idioms in orange:

Hank:  Surprise, Jenny! I heard about you being bedridden. I came to cheer you up.

Jenny: Wow, thanks for coming by. You’ve totally brightened up my day!

Hank: Oh, I almost forgot. I also brought you a pint of your favourite ice cream!

Business Idioms

Average: 3.6 (16 votes)

Whether we like it or not, the English speaking workplace is overflowing with idioms.

Food Idioms

Average: 3.8 (27 votes)

Here are some idioms to revise, all of which are related to food and eating. First look at the literal meanings of the idioms below and then see if you can decide which idiom correctly completes the sentence. Who is the apple of your eye? Is there something that just isn't your cup of tea?

Good luck!

Idiom of the Day: Get a Grip

Average: 4.2 (19 votes)

Tired of idiom

This cartoon is based on the idiom get a grip.

Get a grip means to understand how to deal with something or to control your emotions.

Examples:

"This book really helped me get a grip on politics."

Advanced Body Idioms

Average: 3.6 (15 votes)

An idiom is an expression used that cannot be easily understood by the meaning of each word separately.

Often an idiom, such as under the weather, does not seem to make sense if taken literally. Someone unfamiliar with English idioms would probably not understand that to be under the weather is to be sick.

Idiom of the Day: Take a Shot

Average: 4.1 (24 votes)

Tired of idiom

This cartoon is based on the idiom take a shot.

Take a shot means 'try to do something; to attempt to do something'.

Examples:

"I don't know the answer to your question, but I'll take a shot anyway."

"I haven't played tennis before but I'm going to take a shot this weekend."

10 Idioms

Average: 3.7 (191 votes)

English is a language that is full of many colourful idioms that describe people and situations in a more interesting way than the typical vocabulary. We've looked at idioms many times before and here are 10 more.

For example instead of saying "he's been doing this for a long time", you can say "He's an old hat at this". This is an especially great way of improving your writing.

English Idioms

Here are some more idioms and their meanings:

Elementary Level: Adjective + Of

Average: 3.3 (30 votes)

Some adjectives are followed by a preposition. It can be confusing for English learners because there are no rules to help you remember which prepositions are used with which adjectives. The best way to learn is through practice.

The following seven adjectives are all used with the preposition of.

Example: The letter I wrote was full of mistakes.