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V.7.2 - Idiomatic Language

Music Idioms

Average: 3.7 (18 votes)

The following idioms are all related to music. Which idiom do you think is being shown in the picture below?

I have chosen eight of the most common music idioms and have written them below along with their literal meaning. Now all you need to do is choose which idiom completes each sentence! Can you think of any more music idioms? Good luck!

Idioms for Intermediate Level Students

Average: 4 (25 votes)

English is a language that is full of many colourful idioms that describe people and situations in a more interesting way than the typical vocabulary.

For example instead of saying "he's been doing this for a long time" you can say "He's an old hat at this". This is an especially great way of improving your writing.

Here are some more idioms and their meanings:

Idiom of the Day: Tired of

Average: 3.5 (13 votes)

Tired of idiom

This joke is based on the meaning of the word insomnia and the idiom tired of:

Insomnia (in-SOM-ne-ah) is a common sleep problem. People who have insomnia have trouble falling asleep at night. As a result, they get too little sleep or have poor-quality sleep.

Body Idioms

Average: 3.4 (11 votes)

An idiom is a phrase (a group of words) which means something different from the meanings of the separate words. "Sally let the cat out of the bag" does not mean that Sally took a real cat out of a real bag. It means that she told a secret by mistake.

How well do you know the folllowing idioms?

Business English Idioms

Average: 4.1 (16 votes)

Are any of you studying English for business purposes? Idioms are really common in the workplace and can be heard everywhere, in offices or on factory floors. Here are seven of the most common.

Business before pleasure - you should finish your work before starting to relax and enjoy yourself.

A done deal - a final decision or agreement.

Idiom: Not Float Someone's Boat

Average: 3.3 (10 votes)

mammoth

If something does not float your boat, you do not enjoy it or want it. When something floats your boat, you like it.

Example Sentences:

"The idea of playing football on a cold winter morning doesn't float my boat."

"Reading books doesn't really float my boat."

Plant and Flower Idioms

Average: 4.3 (20 votes)

A few months ago we looked at some plant and flower idioms and many people found the idioms really helpful and interesting. Can you still remember how they are used? Here are some sentences to help you check your memory, as well as two new plant idioms to help you learn something new!

Good luck!

Lesson by Caroline Devane

Medical Idioms

Average: 4.2 (22 votes)

We all get sick from time to time, so it is a good idea to learn some idioms that you may hear on a visit to the doctors or in general conversation; or you may find the idioms useful to use yourself.

Below are some medical idioms along with some example sentences of their use. Can you match them to their meanings? When you are finished, see if you can write some sentences which include the idioms and share them with us.

Lesson by Caroline

Danny's Reading: English Expressions

Average: 4.3 (19 votes)

Sports Idioms

Average: 3.7 (6 votes)

There are so many idioms we use in daily conversation that have a connection with sport.

Look at the list and the explanations.

The sports they are originally derived from are in brackets.

a. To get second wind: to get a sudden burst of energy (sailing). "I was feeling tired after lunch, but I got my second wind in the afternoon."