Learn English | A new lesson every week
Book your course now

vocabulary

'Used to' for Intermediate Level Students

Average: 3.9 (16 votes)

Used to is commonly applied to either speak of a past habit or a situation we are accustomed to. However, the structure that follows 'used to' will be determined by the intended meaning.

For example: used to + infinitive = past habit. For example: I used to smoke but not now.

Verb to be + used to + gerund = an accustomed situation. For example: I am used to smoking; I smoke a packet a day.

Is Pizza A Vegetable?

Average: 3.7 (9 votes)

In USA schools, pizza is now a vegetable!

What did you eat for lunch when you were in school? Could you buy something _1_ to eat in the school cafeteria?

Friends Come In All Shapes And Sizes

Average: 4.3 (10 votes)

Friends are so important and we often find friends in the unlikeliest places! For example, look at this gorilla and tiny duckling who got close at a zoo in New York!

Read through the article and try to decide which word fits in each gap. Then why don’t you call a friend who is also learning English and tell them the story.

Lesson by Caroline

At The Train Station - Word Scramble

Average: 3.8 (12 votes)

Here's an example of a real conversation at the train station.

Read through the dialogue and see if you can unscramble the orange words, all of them are words related to train stations and journeys.

Let me know how you get on. When you're finished, role play the situation with a friend.

Lesson by Caroline Devane

Never Get Lost In A City Again - Upper Intermediate Level

Average: 4 (8 votes)

I am one of those unfortunate people who spends their first few weeks in a new city getting lost. On the plus side this means I am always discovering interesting new places; on the down side it means I always have to leave extra early before heading to my destination. I found these interesting tips on how to find your way in a city using the landmarks around you. I'm not sure how useful they will be to me but it's always good to learn something new!

Police interview: Question words

Average: 3.1 (36 votes)

How much do you remember about the 'wh' question words? This lesson shows a conversation between a police officer and a suspect of a crime. The police officer is asking the suspect a lot of questions to try and get information that will help them to solve the crime.

Read through the text and try to complete the gaps with the missing 'wh' word.

The words you will need are: what, who, when, why, which, how, where

Do you think the suspect is innocent or guilty?

At the Cinema

Average: 4.1 (15 votes)

Here's an example of a real conversation at the cinema. Read through the exchange between the two people and try to re-order the letters of the underlined words to find the correct word! Have you been to the cinema lately? It can be an excellent way to improve your English, particularly your listening skills. Good luck!

Word of the day: Mammoth

Average: 3.3 (10 votes)

mammoth

To help us understand this joke, let's take a look at the two meanings of the word mammoth.

1 - A mammoth (noun): a bit like a dinosaur that was very big and looked like an elephant.

Music Video Lesson - Pixie Lott 'Gravity' and Casual English

Average: 3.6 (7 votes)

This song by Pixie Lott is a perfect example of the 'casual' spelling and pronunciation of some English words. In words ending in 'ing', people often drop the last g. For example 'singing' becomes 'singin'.

Remember: It is useful to be aware of casual or 'slang' English, but it is usually only used in informal situations.

Verb Forms Quiz

Average: 4.2 (73 votes)

Let's have a quick quiz to get your brain thinking on a Monday. I often notice on the comments left on this site that Englisg users have a good vocabulary but get confused over which form of a word is needed.

When learning a new word it's always good to learn an example sentence instead of just the single word. This way you will learn about how the word is used in context.

Choose the best word form in each case.