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G.5.2 - Present Continuous

Present Continuous or Present Simple? Pre-Intermediate

Average: 2.7 (22 votes)

Today's lesson is by Caroline

What is the difference between these two tenses and when do we use each one? Here's a brief explanation of present simple and present continuous as well as a quick test to see how much you remember!

Present Simple and Present Continuous

Average: 3.6 (11 votes)

Present Continuous Word Scramble

Average: 2.7 (9 votes)

Present Continuous is used to describe an action that’s happening at the moment, but it’s also sometimes used to talk about a future plan.

The form of the Present Continuous is:

Crazy Christmas - Elementary/Pre-Intermediate

Average: 3.6 (14 votes)

Today's lesson is from Amy Whiting, EC Cape Town English language school.

Present Simple is used to talk about routines and habits, it uses the form Subject + Verb
Example: We eat turkey at Christmas time

Present simple vs Present Continuous - Elementary Level

Average: 2.6 (12 votes)

Today's lesson comes from Deborah Jane Cairns, EC Cape Town English language school:

State Verbs

Average: 4 (22 votes)

"This shirt costs $50."

"This shirt is costing $50."

Which is correct? Why?

The first sentence - "This shirt costs $50" - is correct because the price of the shirt is fixed; it's a fixed state and therefore we use a state verb, costs.

Present continuous spelling rules

Average: 4.1 (78 votes)

continuous verbs

To make continuous verbs add -ing to the base verb:

what are state verbs?

Average: 3.8 (250 votes)

'They love it' or 'They are loving it'?

When a verb describes a state and not an action  we do not use the continuous tense. For example, 'play' is an action so we can say 'playing' whereas 'be' is a fixed state which does not change: 'To be, or not to be'.

Present Simple and Present Continuous

Average: 3.8 (425 votes)

I surf

'I surf / I am surfing.'

What's the difference between the Present Simple / Present Continuous and how to use them.

We use the present simple tense when we want to talk about fixed habits or routines – things that don’t change.