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vocabulary

Same sound, different meaning

Average: 3.3 (164 votes)

Some words have the same sounds as other words, but they have different meanings and spellings.

Take a look at these examples and then take the quiz.

Won / One

He won a new car in a competition.
I have one brother and two sisters.

See / Sea

It's too dark to see anything. Turn the light on.
She went for a swim in the sea.

In the news: Starbucks to pay for workers' college

Average: 3.6 (22 votes)

Starbucks, which is the largest coffeehouse company in the world, with 23,187 stores in 64 countries, is offering its workers _1_ college degrees.

Any of the company's135,000 employees who work at least 20 hours per week will soon be able to _2_ college at Arizona State University (ASU) Online. Starbucks employees can choose among 40 online courses, _3_ from retail management to electrical engineering.

How to talk about football

Average: 2.8 (17 votes)

The 2014 World Cup is well underway in Brazil. Here are some expressions that will help you talk about football in English.  

1) I missed the Brazil game. What was the score?

2) England have to win this game to go through to the next round.

3) If they don't win they will go out.

4) Who scored for Japan?

5) I can’t believe the referee didn’t give a penalty.

6) He was miles offside!

7) That was never a foul – he dived.

8) Who did you think will win? What do you think the score will be?

Should Have + Past Participle

Average: 3.9 (73 votes)

We use should have + past participle to talk about things we regret.

I got really wet walking home last night, I should have taken an umbrella.

The speaker did not take an umbrella when she went out last night so she got wet. She regrets that she did not take her umbrella.

Regret (verb/noun) is to feel sorry about something that happened or did not happen in the past.

I should have called you sooner.

You should have spoken to me before deciding.

Lend and Borrow

I don't know how to differentiate LEND and BORROW. Please I mean can anyone give me some examples on how to use those words? Thanks Smile

And, Or & But

Average: 3.7 (29 votes)

Conjunctions are used to groups of words, phrases and clauses together. The most common conjunctions are and, or and but.

And

And means also, added to:

Please speak slowly and clearly.

She plays piano and guitar.

Or

Or is used to introduce another possibility:

Shall we go to the cinema or bar?

Are you interested or not?

Suffix: -ever words

Average: 4.5 (11 votes)

Most English wh- words can take the suffix -ever.

Whatever
What+ever

anything, everything or anything:

We do whatever we like.
He'll wear whatever you tell him to.
They usually go out on Friday evenings to a bar or whatever.

Whenever
When+ever

every or any time:

I smile whenever I think about her.
He goes to the gym whenever he has time.

World Cup 2014

Average: 3.4 (30 votes)

What are the ten missing words we need to complete this text?

We are less than one week _1_ from the start of the 2014 World Cup.

This is the twentieth time the tournament has taken place and Brazil is the host nation for the first time _2_ 1950.

The _3_ competition was held in Uruguay in 1930 with the host nation beating Argentina 4-2 in the final.

World Environment Day

Average: 3.9 (14 votes)

World Environment Day ('WED') is _1_ every year on June 5 to _2_ global awareness to take positive environmental action to protect _3_ and the planet Earth. It is run by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

Storytelling - Simple Past Tense

Average: 3.6 (65 votes)

When we talk about past events we usually use the simple past tense. Read this famous children's story and change the simple tense verbs (in orange) to the simple past tense:

Jack and the Beanstalk

Once upon a time there _live_ a poor widow and her son Jack.

All they _have_ was a cow called Daisy.

When the cow _stop_ giving milk, Jack's mother _tell_ him to take their cow to the market and sell it.