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FN.10 - Requests

Beginner Level: Waiter or Customer?

Average: 2.7 (14 votes)

Students - in each sentence do you know who is talking, the waiter or the customer?

For example: 'Would you like fries with that?' is something that the waiter would ask.

When you have answered the questions, tell us what your favourite restaurant is, and your favourite food!

Good luck! PS: Two of the sentences have different words but the same meaning- we say one in American English and one in British English. Which two sentences have the same meaning?

Lesson by Caroline

At The Train Station - Word Scramble

Average: 3.8 (12 votes)

Here's an example of a real conversation at the train station.

Read through the dialogue and see if you can unscramble the orange words, all of them are words related to train stations and journeys.

Let me know how you get on. When you're finished, role play the situation with a friend.

Lesson by Caroline Devane

Chat up lines

Average: 3.2 (17 votes)

A chat up line (or pick-up line in America) is a humourous phrase that someone says to start a conversation with a person they are attracted to.

Chat up lines are an essential part of British pub culture, often used by men and women alike to compliment or start a conversation with someone they are interested in.

They are also, absolutely hilarious!

So here's a fun lesson which contains some of my favourite chat up lines, but with one word missing.

Can you choose which word goes in each one?

How to order a coffee in the UK

Average: 3.4 (11 votes)

All across the UK people are wondering what type of coffee to order today. Some years ago we had lots of cafes serving a nice cup of tea and pretty lousy coffee. Now the UK is overrun with coffee houses serving a bewildering range of refreshing coffees and pretty awful tea.

Polite requests: Match the question to the answer

Average: 4 (16 votes)

Match these ten answers to the requests. Type in the letter, do not type in the whole sentence.

Shopping English

Average: 4 (10 votes)

Are you a shopaholic (a person who shops frequently)? Do you live to shop?

However you feel about it, a little retail therapy (shopping to make you happy) is often a good thing. While you're away on holiday in a foreign country, your family and friends are going to expect some small souvenirs (something you buy to help you remember a holiday/ a holiday present).

Here are a few expressions and words that will make your retail experience a whole lot more enjoyable.

English in the station

Average: 2.4 (7 votes)

Slow, unreliable and expensive - welcome to trains in Britain! As much as British people complain about the train service, trains are, nevertheless, a favourite way too see the country.

Of course, these phrases and vocabulary will help you out in any English speaking country, and on buses too!

Bon Voyage!

 

Link: English in the bank

English in the hotel

Average: 3 (33 votes)

How well could you get by using English in a hotel? Let's find out!

Asking

Average: 3.6 (8 votes)

Here we take a look at how to ask for permission, ask for something and ask someone to do something.

Asking for permission

When we are asking for permission to do something we can use the following expressions:

In the shop: shopping English

Average: 3.8 (10 votes)

'No, thanks. I'm just looking.'

Take a look at the ten questions and statements below. All of these are useful expressions we use when we are shopping. Try and match the sentences to the situations.  When you answer, use numbers in the spaces below.