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Between and Among

Average: 3.6 (25 votes)

Here we take a look at the prepositions of place between and among. We'll look at how to use them and the difference between them.

between

Between means 'in or into the space which separates at least two places, people or objects.'

Match the question to the answer

Average: 3.7 (10 votes)

Read through the ten questions below and choose the answers which best match them:

 

Link: Find the extra word

Using About, Around and -ish

Average: 2.8 (5 votes)

'How many people were at the party?'

Guess the missing word

Average: 3.8 (9 votes)

Read the following ten sentences and choose the best answer to complete each sentence:

 

Link: Synonyms

Wh- words practice

Average: 4 (9 votes)

Take a look at the following ten questions. Each question is missing a wh- word. Choose the corrcect word to complete each sentence. Choose from one of the following words:

who - what -  why - which - where - when - how

Talking about preferences

Shall

Average: 3.1 (10 votes)

'Shall we go?'

Shall is a word which is commonly used in British English, but rarely in American English.
Shall can be used in a number of contexts:

Will

Shall is often used with 'I' or 'we' instead of will:

'I shall call you later.'
'We shall talk about it tomorrow.'

Present continuous spelling rules

Average: 4.1 (71 votes)

continuous verbs

To make continuous verbs add -ing to the base verb:

Subject verb agreement

Average: 3.4 (9 votes)

Take a look at the two following sentences. Which is correct?

'She likes flowers.'
'She like flowers.'

I hope that you said that the first sentence, 'She likes flowers is correct', is correct. But why is it correct?

English Riddle: Can you answer the question?

Average: 3 (43 votes)

Read the following riddle (puzzle) and see if you can think of the answer. Click on 'Show Answer' to solve the riddle:

A father and son have a car accident and are both badly hurt. They are both taken to separate hospitals. When the boy is taken in for an operation, the surgeon (doctor) says 'I can not do the surgery because this is my son'. How is this possible?

Showing offence

Average: 3.5 (16 votes)

When someone says something to you which is rude, they are being offensive; you are offended (you are shocked and angry). When we take offence to what someone has said we use the following phrases to let the person know that we are not happy with what they said: