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Idioms

Prepositions in Phrasal Verbs

Average: 3.7 (11 votes)

Phrasal verbs are made of two parts: a base verb and another small word that is either a preposition or an adverb particle.

It is not always possible to guess the meaning of a phrasal verb from the individual words in it. The more exposure you have to phrasal verbs the easier they are to learn.

Take a look at the following ten sentences and decide which preposition is needed to form the correct phrasal verb.
 

Plant and Flower Idioms

Average: 4.3 (20 votes)

A few months ago we looked at some plant and flower idioms and many people found the idioms really helpful and interesting. Can you still remember how they are used? Here are some sentences to help you check your memory, as well as two new plant idioms to help you learn something new!

Good luck!

Lesson by Caroline Devane

Medical Idioms

Average: 4.2 (22 votes)

We all get sick from time to time, so it is a good idea to learn some idioms that you may hear on a visit to the doctors or in general conversation; or you may find the idioms useful to use yourself.

Below are some medical idioms along with some example sentences of their use. Can you match them to their meanings? When you are finished, see if you can write some sentences which include the idioms and share them with us.

Lesson by Caroline

Danny's Reading: English Expressions

Average: 4.3 (19 votes)

Phrasal Verb: Put

Average: 3.8 (49 votes)

Here is another opportunity for you to practise using phrasal verbs. Phrasal verbs with 'put' are extremely common and here are just a few of them. In each sentence, decide which phrasal verb is needed to complete it correctly. I've put the meanings of the phrasal verbs below to help you decide. Don't put it off until tomorrow! Do this lesson now!

Phrasal Verbs for Travel

Average: 3.5 (36 votes)

Today's lesson reviewd and builds on the 7 travel phrasal verbs we studied at a few weeks ago. Look at the these phrasal verbs and their definitions. Fill in the gaps with the correct phrasal verbs so that the text makes sense. (Keep in mind that the main verb changes according to the time and function of the sentence, e.g. drop off in a past passive structure is I was dropped off.

Sports Idioms

Average: 3.7 (6 votes)

There are so many idioms we use in daily conversation that have a connection with sport.

Look at the list and the explanations.

The sports they are originally derived from are in brackets.

a. To get second wind: to get a sudden burst of energy (sailing). "I was feeling tired after lunch, but I got my second wind in the afternoon."

Travel Phrasal Verbs

Average: 3.6 (9 votes)

Here's an exercise to see how much you remember about these phrasal verbs which are all used to talk about travel and holidays. Decide which phrasal verb fits in each gap. Then check and see if any of them need to be in a different tense.

Remember, it's really important to double check your work for little mistakes!

Good luck!

By Caroline Devane

Common English Similies

Average: 3.2 (36 votes)

A similie is an expression we use when comparing two things using the words 'like' or 'as'.

Here are some common examples:

Head and Mind Idioms

Average: 3.9 (25 votes)

Have you ever given a presentation or made a speech to a group of people? Did you feel nervous? Did the people enjoy what you said?

The Business Presentation

Take a look at this paragraph and pay special attention to the 5 idioms in orange: