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phrasal verbs

Look idioms part 2

Average: 3.1 (15 votes)

Yesterday we had a quiz on Look Phrasal Verbs. Today we continue with look idioms. Read the 7 statements and decide which responses match them.

The correct answers are given below.

Phrasal Verbs with Look

Average: 3.6 (27 votes)

In the English language, a phrasal verb is a verb combined with a preposition or an adverb.

e.g. Look + up/ to/ for/ about/ into etc.

Let's practice! What words do you need to complete the sentences below?

'On' Phrasal Verbs

Average: 3.6 (25 votes)

We recently looked at some phrasal verbs that end with ‘off’, so now it’s time to look at some that end in ‘on’. Here are seven phrasal verbs ending in ‘on’. How many of them do you recognise? Read through the sentences below and decide which phrasal verb is needed for each sentence. Then try to make your own sentences with at least three of the phrasal verbs listed. Good luck!

Phrasal verbs with Down

Average: 3.6 (10 votes)

Yesterday we took a lesson on 'off' phrasal verbs. Today we'll continue by looking at some interesting phrasal verbs ending with 'down'.

Look at the context of each sentence and choose the correct definition. Good luck!

By Seb, EC Cape Town English school

Phrasal verbs with Off

Average: 3.5 (16 votes)

English has a large number of phrasal verbs, many of which use the preposition 'off.'

For example, 'run off' means to leave suddenly and unexpectedly: "I have to run off now or I will be late."

We recently had a lesson on off phrasal verbs, now it's time for more.

Look at the context of each sentence and choose the correct definition. Good luck!

Phrasal Verbs with Out

Average: 3.4 (16 votes)

English has a large number of phrasal verbs, many of which use the preposition out.

For example go out means to leave your home for a short time. Also, remember that some phrasal verbs can have more than one meaning. Go out also means to have a boyfriend/girlfriend.

Look at the context of each sentence and choose the correct definition. Good luck!

Phrasal Verbs with Up

Average: 3.8 (9 votes)

English has a large number of phrasal verbs, many of which use the preposition 'up'.

Quite a lot of phrasal verbs with up mean 'to increase/improve something'. For example speed up means 'to increase your car's speed'. There are exceptions to this such as hold up which means 'to delay something'.

Look at the context of each sentence and choose the correct definition.

Good luck!

Phrasal Verbs + Off

Average: 3.6 (23 votes)

Phrasal verbs are really tricky and many students tell me they are one of the most difficult things about learning English. That is why it is really important to learn them and practise them. Here are seven phrasal verbs ending in 'off'.

How many of them do you recognise? I've written the literal meaning to help you. Read through the sentences below and decide which phrasal verb is needed for each sentence. Then try to make your own sentences with at least three of the phrasal verbs listed.

Idiom of the Day: Tired of

Average: 3.5 (13 votes)

Tired of idiom

This joke is based on the meaning of the word insomnia and the idiom tired of:

Insomnia (in-SOM-ne-ah) is a common sleep problem. People who have insomnia have trouble falling asleep at night. As a result, they get too little sleep or have poor-quality sleep.

Phrasal Verbs: Arguments

Average: 3.4 (18 votes)

Basically, a phrasal verb is a combination of a verb with at least one other word. These can be a verb and an adverb, a verb and a preposition, or even a verb with an adverb and a preposition.

Example: "John flew off the handle." Which means that John became very angry.

Phrasal Verbs

1. grow up - behave responsibly; behave as an adult, not a child.