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phrasal verbs

Idiom of the month: Bring Down

Average: 4.3 (18 votes)

rub it in

Today's joke is based on two meanings of bring down.

Bring down: Make someone depressed, unhappy or exhausted. Get Down can also be used:

"This rainy weather is really bringing me down."

What do you do on Sunday?

Average: 3.6 (28 votes)

Phrasal Verbs Reading

The following text contains 10 highlighted phrasal verbs. Your task is to match them to the correct definitions.

During the week I always have to get up early for work so on Sunday I love to wake up late, usually around 9am and then get up 30 minutes later.

What do you do on Sunday?

Average: 1.5 (2 votes)

Phrasal Verbs Reading

The following text contains 10 highlighted phrasal verbs. Your task is to match them to the correct definitions.

During the week I always have to get up early for work so on Sunday I love to wake up late, usually around 9am and then get up 30 minutes later.

a question to chris

Hello.. This text is from the Yahoo

 

" Prince William may be off the market, but there are still a few eligible royals in the world. "

 

I don't understand the using of "off" in these sentence.. What's the meaning ?

Phrasal Verb Review

Average: 3.6 (16 votes)

This lesson is designed to see how well you remember the meaning of some common phrasal verbs.

Match each phrasal verb below to the correct sentence.

Make sure you use the correct tense!

put down phrasal verb

Hi to All,

I have a doubt if a phrasal verb-"to put down one's papers" which means "to resign" exists or not? some people say it is correct whereas others say there is no such phrasal verb for resignation. -Thanks for any replies.

Sports Idioms

Average: 3.7 (15 votes)

Lots of idiomatic expressions come from things people say to each other in sports. For example in fishing,'to get off the hook' means literally, for the fish to escape! These phrases have been adapted and, as idioms, can be used in a variety of circumstances. In each of these sentences, can you decide which idiom is needed?
Caroline Devane

Phrasal verbs with 'Turn'

Average: 3.3 (10 votes)

Here’s another lesson that gives you an opportunity to revise/learn some phrasal verbs.

Remember, changing the preposition can completely change the meaning of the verb, so we need to know which preposition to add to a verb to create the correct meaning.

Here’s a test to see how well you remember the meaning of these phrasal verbs that use ‘turn’. Which phrasal verb belongs in each sentence? Good luck!
By Caroline Devane

Why do we say 'Just Deserts'?

Average: 3.3 (9 votes)

If you get your just deserts, you get what you deserve.

The word ‘deserts’, in the sense of ‘what you deserve’, has been used in English since the thirteenth century.

‘Just’, of course, means ‘fair’.

It should be noted that the pronunciation of deserts in this expression is stressed on the second syllable, as in ‘desserts’.

The spelling, however, is correct.

A desert is an arid and desolate region of land, and its use as ‘that which is deserved’ is now limited to this single phrase.

Take Phrasal Verbs

Average: 3.4 (11 votes)

We all know that phrasal verbs are one of the most difficult things to learn in English, so here’s a quiz to see how well you remember some of the ones beginning with ‘take’.

Remember, Phrasal Verb = verb + preposition.

For each sentence, chose the correct phrasal verb. Good luck!
Lesson by Caroline