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Confusing Words

What's the difference between Let and Make?

Average: 3.6 (32 votes)

Let: The word "let" means the same as "allow" or "give permission." e.g. "My mother won't let me get my ears pierced until I'm 15."

Make: The word "make" means the same as “"force" or "cause to happen / cause to feel something." e.g. "My boss made me stay late every day this week!"

Superlatives - Elementary Level

Average: 3.8 (20 votes)

The superlative is the greatest form of an adjective and is used when you are comparing more than one thing.

How to use Like

Average: 3.7 (29 votes)

The word like can be confusing for students since it has many different meanings in English. Here are five of its common uses:

Five ways to use 'like'

Like = enjoy
I like coffee

To be + like = describe personality/characteristics
What is he like?

Expressions with Look

Average: 3.2 (18 votes)

Definitions:

Look for: try to find something
Look forward to: wait with pleasure for something which is going to happen
Look after: be responsible for or take care of someone or something

Complete the sentences with these expressions:

I'm looking forward to...
I'm looking for...
I'm looking after...

Elementary Level: Ever or Never

Average: 3.5 (42 votes)

Time for a review of ever and never.

Ever means 'at any time'and is used in questions.

Use ever with nothing, nobody for things that haven not happened before. "Nobody has ever seen me dance!"

Ever is also used with 'the first time' for first experiences. "This is the first time I've ever been abroad."

Use never when you have not had an experience: "I have never been to France."

Elementary Level: Adjective + Of

Average: 3.3 (30 votes)

Some adjectives are followed by a preposition. It can be confusing for English learners because there are no rules to help you remember which prepositions are used with which adjectives. The best way to learn is through practice.

The following seven adjectives are all used with the preposition of.

Example: The letter I wrote was full of mistakes.

Get / Become

Average: 3.8 (37 votes)

The word get has many different meanings in English, such as 'receive'. However, another very common meaning is also 'become'.

For example: “I’m getting cold” means the same as “I’m becoming cold”
The only real difference is that get is more informal and popular to use.

The structure is: GET + ADJECTIVE.

Make and Do Explained

Average: 2.7 (17 votes)

Make

Generally make means 'create'.

For example: make breakfast or make a speech. However, there are some exceptions.

Never say: make a party, in English we use throw a party or organise a party.

Do

Generally do is for activities.

Word Order: Adjectives

Average: 3.2 (19 votes)

Rules:

Do you know where to put the adjective in a sentence? Follow these simple rules to help you remember:

1. The adjective comes before the noun.
e.g. I live in a small house.
I have a blue umbrella.

2. The adjective comes after the verb to be.
e.g. I am very tired.
Careful, the food is hot!

Prefixes: Un, Dis, Im, Mis

Average: 3.8 (483 votes)

A prefix is placed at the beginning of a word to change its meaning. For example, the suffix re- means either again or back as in return, repeat or refurbish.

The following 4 prefixes are easy to confuse because they all have a negative meaning.

un-

The prefix un means not, reverse action, deprive of, release from. For example, unable or unfair.